National Library of Australia

Help Home

User favourites

Registered users can save records as "favourites" and then group them into categories, which effectively bookmarks the records for quick retrieval. You can also opt to make lists of your favourites shareable, so other catalogue users can view them.

To add a record to your favourites you will need to be logged in. Then click the "add to favourites" link near the top of the full record display page on any record:

-

You will then be prompted to save your record:

-

All saved favourites are automatically added to the default "no group", but if you have set up separate groups for your favourites, you can choose to add the record to one of these as well by selecting it from the drop down list. You can also add notes about the record at this point.

To access your favourites page, click on the link near the top right corner of any screen:

-

A list of all your favourites will be displayed.

-

From this page you can perform several tasks such as adding notes to your records, deleting unwanted records or organising them into groups you have defined.

You can also sort your favourites by date added, author or title.

-

To categorise your favourites into groups, select the "Create one now" link from the Groups section on the right of the screen.

You can email your list of favourites or export them as Endnote, Bibtex or MARC21 records by selecting the appropriate links at the right of the screen.

You can also opt to make your list of favourites shareable so that other users may view them by selecting the Share link. This will publish your list under the User Lists link at the top of any catalogue screen:

-
New search | User lists | Site feedback | Ask a librarian | Help
-
Members of Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and Maori communities are advised that this catalogue contains names and images of deceased people. All users of the catalogue should also be aware that certain words, terms or descriptions may be culturally sensitive and may be considered inappropriate today, but may have reflected the author's/creator's attitude or that of the period in which they were written.