National Library of Australia

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Daphne McDonald, retired teacher, discusses her life, recites poetry and sings folksongs of a bygone era [sound recording] / interviewer, Rob Willis; recorded with Bruce Cameron
Bib ID 1119256
Format AudioAudio [sound recording]
Author
McDonald, Daphne, 1914-, Interviewee
 
Access Conditions Access open for research, personal copies and public use. 
Description 2003 
2 digital audio tapes (ca. 94 min.) 
Series

Rob Willis folklore collection

Summary

Folkloric recording.

Daphne McDonald, born at The Oaks, near Camden, N.S.W. recalls her father, Thomas Seymour, a carpenter from the Burragorang Valley, N.S.W. and first lieutenant in WW I; her mother Ruth Mary Healey, born in Ballarat, N.S.W. who established a midwifery Hospital at Weerona, N.S.W.; her mother's music and the songs she learnt from her; circumstances which led to her and her sister living in an orphanage and convent for a number of years; her childhood in Wollongong, N.S.W.; her training as a Domestic Science teacher, at Sydney Teacher's College (1930); first posting as an infant teacher, bonded for 3 years to Boronia Park, Sydney; posting to Baradine, N.S.W. at 21 years of age to teach a combined kindergarten, 1st & 2nd class totaling 60 children (1935); teaching post at Balgowrie, N.S.W. (1940); memories of air raid sirens; a great number of children's games and rhymes learnt during her time a teacher; teaching in the Illawarra region, N.S.W. on 35 shillings per week (1934)

McDonald recalls the Undesirable Climate Allowance payable for working at Baradine; social activities at Baradine, such as walking, golf, Bachelor & Spinster Balls; types of dances performed at balls; fires in Baradine; general stores and community life in Baradine (1930s onwards); Baradine School; return to work as a Librarian (1960s)

Partial contents
  • TAPE 1 Singing: The banks of Allan Water (fragment)
  • Recitation: The banks of Allan Water (song)
  • Singing: This is the end of a perfect day (fragment)
  • We don't want to loose you- Boer War (fragment)
  • repeated
  • Just before the battle mother (fragment)
  • Do not trust him, gentle maiden (fragment)
  • Recitation: The passion flower (song fragment)
  • Singing: The passion flower
  • The wearing of the green (fragment)
 
Notes

Recorded on Sept. 3, 2003 at Baradine, N.S.W.

Index/Finding Aid Note Timed summary (5 p.) 
Subjects McDonald, Daphne, .1914- -- Interviews.  |  Folk singers -- New South Wales -- Baradine -- Interviews.  |  Folk songs, English -- New South Wales -- History -- 1901-1945.  |  Games -- New South Wales -- History -- 1901-1945  |  Teachers -- New South Wales -- Social conditions -- 1901-1945 -- Anecdotes.  |  Nursery rhymes, English -- New South Wales -- History -- 1901-1945.
Occupation Teachers  |  Folk singers
Other authors/contributors Willis, Rob, 1944-, Interviewer  |  Cameron, Bruce, 1953-, Interviewer

Online

    In the Library

    Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

    Order a copy

    - Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

    Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
    close Can I borrow items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close What can I get online?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    Members of Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and Maori communities are advised that this catalogue contains names and images of deceased people. All users of the catalogue should also be aware that certain words, terms or descriptions may be culturally sensitive and may be considered inappropriate today, but may have reflected the author's/creator's attitude or that of the period in which they were written.