-
You must be logged in to Tag Records
The London convict maid
Bib ID 6328307
Format BookBook, OnlineOnline [text, sheet]
Online Versions
Description [London] : Birt Printer, [circa 1830] 
1 sheet : illustration ; 26 x 19 cm 
Summary

A transportation broadside with an anonymous ten verse ballad inspired by Charlotte W., a London servant girl sentenced to seven years’ transportation for robbing her master in order to marry her lover. It is illustrated with a vignette woodcut portrait above a half column introduction, which states that the poem is based on a letter sent from ‘Hobart Town’ by Charlotte to her mother, although in the fifth verse of the poem the judge tells her: “To Botany Bay you will be conveyed, / For seven years a Convict Maid.”--Adapted from Douglas Stewart Fine Books Catalogue, August 2013.

Biography/History

“Charlotte W---, the subject of this narrative, is a native of London, born of honest parents, she was early taught the value and importance of honesty and virtue; but unhappily ere her attaining the age of maturity, her youthful affections were placed on a Young Tradesman, and to raise money to marry her lover, she yielded to the temptation to rob her master, and his property being found in her possession, she was immediately apprehended, tried at the Old Bailey Sessions, convicted and sentenced to seven years transportation. On her arrival at Hobart Town, she sent her mother a very affecting and pathetic letter, from which the following verses have been composed, and they are here published by particular desire, in the confident hope that this account of her sufferings will serve as an example to deter other females from similar practices.”--Introduction.

Notes

"Birt Printer, 3 Great St. Andrew Street, Seven Dials".

Caption title.

First stanza reads: “Ye London maids attend to me, / While I relate my misery, / Thro' London streets I oft have stray'd, / But now I am a Convict Maid.”

Also available online http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-1117449

A version of the same ballad with variant title (The Convict Maid), printed in Birmingham by Jackson and Son, probably in the 1820s, is held in the collection of the Monash University Library. Facsimiles of four slightly different versions of The London Convict Maid produced by other British provincial printers and held in U.K. libraries are reproduced in Ron Edwards' The Convict Maid: early broadsides relating to Australia (1985).

Ingleton, Geoffrey C. True patriots all, or, News from early Australia as told in a collection of broadsides (Sydney: Angus & Robertson, 1952), pages 165 & 271, note 115.

Source of Acquisition Library's N copy from the collection of of Australian bibliophile, Harry Hodges. 
Cited In

Ferguson, J.A. Australia, 1376.

Subjects Ballads, English - Australia - Texts.  |  Australian poetry.  |  Convicts - Poetry.  |  Australia - Poetry.  |  Australian
Other authors/contributors Hodges, Harry Gordon, former owner
Also Titled

Convict maid

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
F/Broadside N114
Copy: N copy
Petherick Reading Room (Australian Rare or Fragile)
In Use (Staff Official Loan)
-

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Members of Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and Maori communities are advised that this catalogue contains names and images of deceased people. All users of the catalogue should also be aware that certain words, terms or descriptions may be culturally sensitive and may be considered inappropriate today, but may have reflected the author's/creator's attitude or that of the period in which they were written.