National Library of Australia

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 2 of 13
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Invasion to embassy : land in Aboriginal politics in New South Wales, 1770-1972 / Heather Goodall
Bib ID 1174967
Format BookBook
Author
Goodall, Heather
 
Description St. Leonards, N.S.W. : Allen & Unwin in association with Black Books, 1996 
xxiv, 421 p., xii p. of plates : ill., maps ; 23 cm. 
ISBN 1864481498 (paperback)
Summary

Invasion to Embassy challenges the conventional view of Aboriginal politics to process a bold new account of Aboriginal responses to invasion and dispossession in New South Wales. At the core of these responses has been land: as a concrete goal, but also as a rallying cry, a call for justice and a focal point for identity. This rich story is told through the words and memories of many of the key activists who were involved in the struggles on the lands and in the towns of NSW. By exploring interactions between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people over land, this book enables us to understand our history through the reality of the conflicts, tensions, negotiations and cooperation which make up our experience of colonialism. Invasion to Embassy is unique in presenting NSW Aboriginal history as a history of activism, rather than a saga of passivity and victimisation. In telling this engrossing story, Heather Goodall reveals much about white Australians - not only as oppressors, but as allies and as newcomers who must in turn sort out their relations to the land.lgo Oth

Traces Aboriginal responses to invasion and dispossession in New South Wales; discusses early attempts by colonial authorities to recognise Aboriginal land rights and title 1838 to 1852; creation of Aboriginal reserves in pastoral areas and reasons for first reserves; dual occupation of land; impact of more intensified land use; setting up of the Aborigines Protection Board and its dispersal policies - characterised as the second wave of dispossession; formation of the Australian Aboriginal Progressive Association in New South Wales; describes life under the "Dog Act" in the 1930s; describes living conditions in Moree 1927 to 1933; Cumeragunja and the formation of the Australian Aboriginal League in Victoria; life under the 'Dog Act' in Menindee, Brewarrina and Burnt Bridge; land and politics 1937 to 1938; Cumeragunja strike 1939; politics in the 1950s and 1960s; reassertion of land rights 1957 to 1964; background and reasons for setting up Tent Embassy in Canberra in 1972.

Notes

Includes index.

Bibliography: p. 391-405.

Subjects Native title (Australia)  |  Aboriginal Australians -- New South Wales -- Government relations.  |  Aboriginal Australians -- New South Wales -- Land tenure.  |  Aboriginal Australians -- New South Wales -- Politics and government.  |  Law - Land - State and Territory - New South Wales.  |  Government policy - Initial period and protectionism.  |  Politics and Government - Political action - Indigenous embassies and political missions - Tent Embassy, Parliament House, Canberra.  |  Politics and Government - Political action - Land rights.  |  Settlement and contacts - Government settlements, reserves.  |  Government policy - Assimilation.  |  Culture - Relationship to land.  |  Government policy - State and territory - New South Wales.  |  New South Wales (NSW)  |  Menindee (NW NSW SI54-03)  |  Brewarrina (N NSW SH55-06)  |  Victoria (Vic)  |  Moree (N NSW SH55-08)  |  Burnt Bridge (NSW N Coast SH56-14)  |  Cummeragunja (SW NSW SJ55-01)
000 04373cam a2200541 a 4500
001 1174967
005 20180905061918.0
008 960424s1996    xnaab    b    001 0 eng d
010 |a97146550
019 1 |a12232004
020 |a1864481498|qpaperback|c$29.95
035 |9(AuCNLDY)2375151
035 |a1174967
040 |aANB|beng|cANB|dABN:1
042 |aanuc
043 |au-at-ne
050 4 |aDU124.L3|bG66 1996
082 0 4 |a333.208999150944|221
082 0 4 |a333.2/089/99150944|221
082 0 4 |a333.208999150944|220
100 1 |aGoodall, Heather.
245 1 0 |aInvasion to embassy :|bland in Aboriginal politics in New South Wales, 1770-1972 /|cHeather Goodall.
260 |aSt. Leonards, N.S.W. :|bAllen & Unwin in association with Black Books,|c1996.
300 |axxiv, 421 p., xii p. of plates :|bill., maps ;|c23 cm.
500 |aIncludes index.
504 |aBibliography: p. 391-405.
520 |aInvasion to Embassy challenges the conventional view of Aboriginal politics to process a bold new account of Aboriginal responses to invasion and dispossession in New South Wales. At the core of these responses has been land: as a concrete goal, but also as a rallying cry, a call for justice and a focal point for identity. This rich story is told through the words and memories of many of the key activists who were involved in the struggles on the lands and in the towns of NSW. By exploring interactions between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people over land, this book enables us to understand our history through the reality of the conflicts, tensions, negotiations and cooperation which make up our experience of colonialism. Invasion to Embassy is unique in presenting NSW Aboriginal history as a history of activism, rather than a saga of passivity and victimisation. In telling this engrossing story, Heather Goodall reveals much about white Australians - not only as oppressors, but as allies and as newcomers who must in turn sort out their relations to the land.lgo Oth
520 |aTraces Aboriginal responses to invasion and dispossession in New South Wales; discusses early attempts by colonial authorities to recognise Aboriginal land rights and title 1838 to 1852; creation of Aboriginal reserves in pastoral areas and reasons for first reserves; dual occupation of land; impact of more intensified land use; setting up of the Aborigines Protection Board and its dispersal policies - characterised as the second wave of dispossession; formation of the Australian Aboriginal Progressive Association in New South Wales; describes life under the "Dog Act" in the 1930s; describes living conditions in Moree 1927 to 1933; Cumeragunja and the formation of the Australian Aboriginal League in Victoria; life under the 'Dog Act' in Menindee, Brewarrina and Burnt Bridge; land and politics 1937 to 1938; Cumeragunja strike 1939; politics in the 1950s and 1960s; reassertion of land rights 1957 to 1964; background and reasons for setting up Tent Embassy in Canberra in 1972.
650 0 |aNative title (Australia)
650 0 |aAboriginal Australians|zNew South Wales|xGovernment relations.
650 0 |aAboriginal Australians|zNew South Wales|xLand tenure.
650 0 |aAboriginal Australians|zNew South Wales|xPolitics and government.
650 7 |aLaw - Land - State and Territory - New South Wales.|2aiatsiss
650 7 |aGovernment policy - Initial period and protectionism.|2aiatsiss
650 7 |aPolitics and Government - Political action - Indigenous embassies and political missions - Tent Embassy, Parliament House, Canberra.|2aiatsiss
650 7 |aPolitics and Government - Political action - Land rights.|2aiatsiss
650 7 |aSettlement and contacts - Government settlements, reserves.|2aiatsiss
650 7 |aGovernment policy - Assimilation.|2aiatsiss
650 7 |aCulture - Relationship to land.|2aiatsiss
650 7 |aGovernment policy - State and territory - New South Wales.|2aiatsiss
651 7 |aNew South Wales (NSW)|2aiatsisp
651 7 |aMenindee (NW NSW SI54-03)|2aiatsisp
651 7 |aBrewarrina (N NSW SH55-06)|2aiatsisp
651 7 |aVictoria (Vic)|2aiatsisp
651 7 |aMoree (N NSW SH55-08)|2aiatsisp
651 7 |aBurnt Bridge (NSW N Coast SH56-14)|2aiatsisp
651 7 |aCummeragunja (SW NSW SJ55-01)|2aiatsisp
984 |aANL|cNL 333.208999150944 G646
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.