National Library of Australia

 Summer Opening Hours:

Our opening hours will be changing between Tuesday 24 December 2019 and Wednesday 1 January 2020.

All reading rooms will be closed from Christmas Day, reopening on 2 January. But you’ll still be able to visit our Exhibition Galleries, our children’s holiday space, WordPlay, and Bookshop from 9am-5pm (except on Christmas Day).Bookplate café will also be open during this period, but with varied hours.

Be sure to check our Summer Opening Hours before you visit: https://www.nla.gov.au/visit-us/opening-hours

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Max Weber : the lawyer as social thinker / Stephen P. Turner and Regis A. Factor
Bib ID 1976934
Format BookBook
Author
Turner, Stephen P., 1951-
 
Description London ; New York : Routledge, 1994 
x, 206 p. ; 22 cm. 
ISBN 0415114527 (paperback)
0415067510
Summary

Max Weber: The Lawyer as Social Thinker aims to relate the categories of Weber's social thinking to the intellectual context of legal thinking and theory in which he was educated. It aims to show how knowledge of these relations illuminates our understanding of Weber's own intentions. The authors submit that Weber radically undermines teleological social theory by providing a thoroughly anti-teleological sociology. The book identifies some of the key sources of Weber's thought within the legal tradition, notably the jurisprudential theorist Rudolph von Ihering, a typical teleological thinker influenced by Bentham as well as neo-Kantianism. Some of Weber's most famous ideas, for example his claim that explanations of action should be adequate on the level of meaning and the level of cause, the concept of ideal interests, and his stress on "vocations", are shown to be variants of Ihering's concepts. The differences are systematic and profoundly revealing.

Max Weber: The Lawyer as Social Thinker is the only account of the sources of Weber's sociology in the legal tradition, as distinct from an account of Weber's sociology of law. The book leads to a new interpretation of Weber. It should be of interest to scholars in social theory, jurisprudence and the history of ideas.

Full contents
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Common Starting Points: The World Created by Purpose and the Concept of Action
  • 3. Interests and Ideals
  • 4. The Commands of Morality
  • 5. Authority: States, Charisma, and Recht
  • 6. Cause
  • 7. Abstraction
  • 8. Epilogue
  • Appendix: Weber's classification of action.
 
Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 191-196) and index.

Subjects Weber, Max, 1864-1920.  |  Sociology -- Methodology.  |  Law -- Methodology.
Other authors/contributors Factor, Regis A., 1937-

Online

    In the Library

    Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

    Details Collect From
    YY 301.092 W375 Main Reading Room

    Order a copy

    - Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

    Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
    close Can I borrow items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close What can I get online?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
    Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.