National Library of Australia

You must be logged in to Tag Records
David Osborne Hay interviewed by Mel Pratt in the Mel Pratt collection [sound recording]
Bib ID 2250420
Format AudioAudio, OnlineOnline [sound recording]
Author
Hay, David, Sir, 1916-2009, interviewee
 
Online Versions
Access Conditions Access open for research, personal copies and public use. 
Description 1973 Dec. 18 - 1974 Aug. 9 
11 tape reels (approximately 42 hr. 53 min.) : 1 7/8 ips, mono. ; 5 in. 
Series

Mel Pratt collection.

Summary

Sir David, a diplomat, talks of his childhood in Corowa, NSW and Geelong; his education at Geelong Grammar School; James Darling; Brasenose College, Oxford; his entry into the Public Service; enlistment in the AIF; his experiences in the Mediterranean during World War II; his wartime experiences in New Guinea; Evatt; 1949 UN General Assembly; his Ottawa postings; the Imperial Defence College; his experiences in Thailand; Foreign Affairs administration; Casey; Canadian diplomats; Jim Plimsoll; New Guinea and the UN; preparations to return to Papua New Guinea as Administrator; his first annual report; relations with the districts; financial delegations; economic and political developments, 1968; Bougainville; Gazelle; 1969 report; Tolai situation; police intervention; taxes; Bougainville, 1969; CRA benefits to the territory; loss of land; separatist issue; passive resistance; confrontation; purchase of Arawa plantation; Conzinc Riotino Company; his personal concerns over Bougainville; West Irian liaison; constitutional changes.

Hay discusses his relations with the Minister and the Department; economic developments, 1969; Whitlam's visit; Committee on Constitutional development; preparation of handover of powers, 1970; Warmaram Group; Prime Minister's visit; use of the army; police requirements; his contributions as administrator; expatriate public servants; his approach to running the Dept of External Territories; transfer of authority into Papua New Guinea Ministerial hands; law and order; Gazelle, 1970; Australian aid and the Budget; management and organisation of the public service; expatriates.

Biography/History

Sir David Hay served as a member of the Australian diplomatic service and was one of the key figures in the administration of the Territory of Papua New Guinea until that country became self-governing on December 1st, 1973.

Notes

Recorded at his office in Canberra.

Also available online http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-193250233

Index/Finding Aid Note Timed summary and transcript (918 p.) available. 
Subjects Hay, David, Sir, 1916-2009 -- Interviews.  |  Diplomats -- Australia -- Interviews.
Occupation Diplomats.
Other authors/contributors Pratt, Mel, interviewer

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
ORAL TRC 121/65
Copy: Recording
Special Collections Reading Room
ORAL TRC 121/65 (transcript)
Copy: Transcript
Special Collections Reading Room
ORAL TRC 121/65 (summary)
Copy: Summary
Special Collections Reading Room

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.