National Library of Australia

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Young Australians and domestic violence / David Indermaur
Bib ID 2500919
Format BookBook, OnlineOnline
Author
Indermaur, David
 
Online Versions
Description Canberra : Australian Institute of Criminology, 2001 
1 folded sheet (6 p.) : ill. ; 30 cm. 
ISBN 0642242208
Series

Trends & issues in crime and criminal justice no. 195.

Summary

Up to one-quarter of young people in Australia have witnessed an incident of physical or domestic violence against their mother or stepmother. These findings come from a survey of 5,000 Australians aged between 12 and 20 from all States and Territories in Australia. Data of this nature have not been available before, and it must be noted that what is included within the definition of domestic violence is crucial to the amount reported. The rate of witnessing varied considerably depending on the nature of household living arrangements. For example, the witnessing of male to female parental violence ranged from 14 per cent for those young people living with both parents to 41 per cent for those living with "mum and her partner". Young people of lower socioeconomic status were about one and a half times more likely to be aware of violence towards their mothers or fathers than those from upper socioeconomic households. Indigenous youth were significantly more likely to have experienced physical domestic violence amongst their parents or parents' partners. In the case of male to female violence, the rate was 42 per cent compared to 23 per cent for all respondents, and for female to male violence the rate was 33 per cent compared to 22 per cent. The findings in relation to the effect of witnessing domestic violence on both attitudes and experience give support to the "cycle of violence" thesis: witnessing parental domestic violence is the strongest predictor of perpetration of violence in young people's own intimate relationships. This paper is a contribution to policy development in diverse family and community arrangements.- 7

Notes

Caption title.

"February 2001".

Includes bibliographical references (p. 6).

Also available in an electronic version via the Internet at: http://www.aic.gov.au/publications/tandi/tandi195.html

Cited In

APAIS. This database is available on the Informit Online Internet Service: http://www.informit.com.au

Australian Public Affairs - Full Text until December 2013

Subjects Family violence -- Australia.  |  Crime prevention surveys -- Australia.  |  Youth and violence -- Australia.  |  Dating violence -- Australia.
Other authors/contributors Australian Institute of Criminology
000 03313cam a2200409 a 4500
001 2500919
005 20180908104725.0
008 010417s2001    acaa     b   f000 0 eng r
019 1 |a22592394
020 |a0642242208|c$5.50
024 0 |aAIC195
035 |9(AuCNLDY)3048570
040 |aAIC|beng|cAIC
042 |aanuc
043 |au-at---
050 0 0 |aHQ809.3.A8|bI52 2001
100 1 |aIndermaur, David.
245 1 0 |aYoung Australians and domestic violence /|cDavid Indermaur.
260 |aCanberra :|bAustralian Institute of Criminology,|c2001.
300 |a1 folded sheet (6 p.) :|bill. ;|c30 cm.
490 1 |aTrends & issues in crime and criminal justice,|x0817-8542 ;|vno. 195
500 |aCaption title.
500 |a"February 2001".
504 |aIncludes bibliographical references (p. 6).
510 2 |aAPAIS. This database is available on the Informit Online Internet Service: http://www.informit.com.au
510 2 |aAustralian Public Affairs - Full Text until December 2013
520 0 |aUp to one-quarter of young people in Australia have witnessed an incident of physical or domestic violence against their mother or stepmother. These findings come from a survey of 5,000 Australians aged between 12 and 20 from all States and Territories in Australia. Data of this nature have not been available before, and it must be noted that what is included within the definition of domestic violence is crucial to the amount reported. The rate of witnessing varied considerably depending on the nature of household living arrangements. For example, the witnessing of male to female parental violence ranged from 14 per cent for those young people living with both parents to 41 per cent for those living with "mum and her partner". Young people of lower socioeconomic status were about one and a half times more likely to be aware of violence towards their mothers or fathers than those from upper socioeconomic households. Indigenous youth were significantly more likely to have experienced physical domestic violence amongst their parents or parents' partners. In the case of male to female violence, the rate was 42 per cent compared to 23 per cent for all respondents, and for female to male violence the rate was 33 per cent compared to 22 per cent. The findings in relation to the effect of witnessing domestic violence on both attitudes and experience give support to the "cycle of violence" thesis: witnessing parental domestic violence is the strongest predictor of perpetration of violence in young people's own intimate relationships. This paper is a contribution to policy development in diverse family and community arrangements.- 7
530 |aAlso available in an electronic version via the Internet at: http://www.aic.gov.au/publications/tandi/tandi195.html
650 0 |aFamily violence|zAustralia.
650 0 |aCrime prevention surveys|zAustralia.
650 0 |aYouth and violence|zAustralia.
650 0 |aDating violence|zAustralia.
710 2 |aAustralian Institute of Criminology.
830 0 |aTrends & issues in crime and criminal justice|vno. 195.
856 4 1 |uhttp://www.aic.gov.au/publications/tandi/tandi195.html
856 4 1 |uhttp://www.aic.gov.au/publications/tandi/ti195.pdf
856 4 1 |zArchived at ANL|uhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.arc-10850
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.