National Library of Australia

Reopening Update - August 2020: Enjoy a CovidSafe visit to the National Library. Read more...

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Age of delirium : the decline and fall of the Soviet Union / David Satter
Bib ID 2575408
Format BookBook
Author
Satter, David, 1947-
 
Edition 1st ed. 
Description New York : A.A. Knopf, 1996 
xvii, 424 p. ; 24 cm. 
ISBN 0394529340
Summary

Feared and respected as one of the world's two great superpowers, the Soviet Union throughout the final twenty years of its life was a model of state-organized delusion. As David Satter shows in powerful detail, the leaders of the Kremlin found that when their carefully constricted facade fell apart in the late 1980s, there was nothing to prop up the crumbling ruins.

Satter's book demonstrates compellingly how the Soviet people were forced to live a gigantic lie. During nearly two decades of reporting for the Financial Times and Reader's Digest, he interviewed Soviet citizens all across the vast country, not just the dissidents and party apparatchiks in Moscow but ordinary men and women. Traveling with him from coal mines and farms to bureaucratic reception halls to the nightmarish wards of punitive psychiatric hospitals to railroad stations where victims of the Communist system set up camp, the reader witnesses how an entire state was constituted on the basis of a fraudulent version of reality. In the Soviet Union, lying - at the grocery and the factory as well as the government office - was universal and obligatory, and Westerners were seldom able to penetrate the perplexing mosaic of wishful thinking and denial that camouflaged a brutal regime.

Subjects Soviet Union -- History.
000 01995cam a2200277 a 4500
001 2575408
005 20180905040637.0
008 950818s1996    nyu           00000 eng  
010 |a95038592
019 1 |a11879036
020 |a0394529340
035 |9(AuCNLDY)2345142
035 |a2575408
040 |aANL|beng|dANL
043 |ae-ur---
050 0 0 |aDK266|b.S267 1996
082 0 0 |a947.084|220
100 1 |aSatter, David,|d1947-
245 1 0 |aAge of delirium :|bthe decline and fall of the Soviet Union /|cDavid Satter.
250 |a1st ed.
260 |aNew York :|bA.A. Knopf,|c1996.
300 |axvii, 424 p. ;|c24 cm.
520 |aFeared and respected as one of the world's two great superpowers, the Soviet Union throughout the final twenty years of its life was a model of state-organized delusion. As David Satter shows in powerful detail, the leaders of the Kremlin found that when their carefully constricted facade fell apart in the late 1980s, there was nothing to prop up the crumbling ruins.
520 8 |aSatter's book demonstrates compellingly how the Soviet people were forced to live a gigantic lie. During nearly two decades of reporting for the Financial Times and Reader's Digest, he interviewed Soviet citizens all across the vast country, not just the dissidents and party apparatchiks in Moscow but ordinary men and women. Traveling with him from coal mines and farms to bureaucratic reception halls to the nightmarish wards of punitive psychiatric hospitals to railroad stations where victims of the Communist system set up camp, the reader witnesses how an entire state was constituted on the basis of a fraudulent version of reality. In the Soviet Union, lying - at the grocery and the factory as well as the government office - was universal and obligatory, and Westerners were seldom able to penetrate the perplexing mosaic of wishful thinking and denial that camouflaged a brutal regime.
651 0 |aSoviet Union|xHistory.
984 |aANL|cYY 947.084 S253
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.