National Library of Australia

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 205 of 437
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Ned Grogan interviewed by Norm and Pat O'Connor and Maryjean Officer the Norm O'Connor folklore collection [sound recording]
Bib ID 2913361
Format AudioAudio [sound recording]
Author
Grogan, Ned, Interviewee
 
Access Conditions Access open for research, personal copies and public use. 
Description 1963 Dec. 21 
1 tape reel (ca. 89 min.) analog, 3 3/4 ips, half track mono ; 7 in. 
Series

Norm O'Connor folklore collection.

Summary

Folkloric recording.

Full contents
  • Ned Grogan talks about sandhills near Mildura ; sleeper cutting; robbery on goldfields; man at Cape Leeuwin a 'groper'; born in Western Australia; he didn't like all the settlers; had six mules in Victoria and 34 racehorses; women or wharves prayed that scales from Victoria would drown; brought to Western Australia to break strike; Mrs Temple started the Shearer's Union, now the Australian Worker's Union; working on stations; met Henry Lawson; worked for Lord Carrington at Berrigan; about Nannup, Western Australia; convict workers; Lord Forrest; working in Bendigo; Miners' Union; working as a drover's cook.
  • Ned Grogan interview continued: about Aborigines that Grogan knew when near Comeragunja Mission, knew some of Briggs family, Aboriginal schools, maps drawn on ground, Aborigines follow flocks of birds for food, many waterholes only known to blacks, the curse has been white men wanting Aboriginal women, they cook kangaroos, possums and fish in pit on the coals, Ned cooked damper in camp oven or in fine dust of ashes, yarn about biggest potato, river boat captains, song about Johnny Troy has many verses he can't remember; knew, 'Wild Colonial Bay', 'Old Bark Hut', many poems and songs in 'The Worker' (A.W.U. Magazine) written by shearers about the war, in the Islands, in Singapore, Menzies' exemption from war, Menzies ignoring his former wet-nurse' requests for a small loan, Menzie's cousin arrested for being a peeping Tom.
 
Notes

Part of a collection of recordings and related material collected during the 1950s and 1960s by Norm O'Connor and others for the Folk Lore society of Victoria.

Ned Grogan recorded on 21 December 1963.

Digital master available National Library of Australia

Subjects Aboriginal Australians -- Anecdotes.  |  Anecdotes -- Australia.  |  Folklore -- Australia.  |  Strikes and lockouts -- Sheep-shearing -- Western Australia.
Other authors/contributors O'Connor, Norman, Interviewer  |  O'Connor, Pat, Interviewer  |  Officer, Maryjean, Interviewer  |  Folk Lore Society of Victoria

Online

    In the Library

    Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

    Details Collect From
    ORAL TRC 2539/60
    Copy: Recording
    Special Collections Reading Room

    Order a copy

    - Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

    Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
    close Can I borrow items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close What can I get online?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
    Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.