National Library of Australia

Enjoy a CovidSafe visit to the National Library. Read more...

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 2 of 16
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Blackfellas, whitefellas, and the hidden injuries of race / Gillian Cowlishaw
Bib ID 3070669
Format BookBook
Author
Cowlishaw, Gillian K. (Gillian Keir), 1934-
 
Online Versions
Description Malden, Mass. : Blackwell Pub., 2004 
xvi, 272 p. : maps ; 24 cm. 
ISBN 1405114037
1405114045
Summary

"In the first half of Blackfellas, Whitefellas, and the Hidden Injuries of Race Cowlishaw uses the talk of the town to uncover the complicated story of that hot summer night. Local and national meanings of the riot are exposed and the entrenched racial binary evident in everyday relationships is explored. In the second half of the book, Cowlishaw raises questions about history/memory, citizenship/respect, and interpellation/abjection as means of considering the politics, social science, and psychology of race rivalry and indigenous marginality." "Written both for beginners and those well-versed in contemporary debates, Blackfellas, Whitefellas, and the Hidden Injuries of Race introduces new readers to key theories of race relations and offers more seasoned readers her fresh perspective on racial and Aboriginal politics."--BOOK JACKET.

"In December 1997, in a small town in rural Australia, a fight broke out among local Aborigines that turned into a full-blown riot when police intervened in force. In Blackfellas, Whitefellas, and the Hidden Injuries of Race, anthropologist Gillian Cowlishaw uses this vivid incident as a means of launching a larger discussion about race, identity, and racialized violence. In this lively, highly readable ethnography, Cowlishaw brings indigenous Australians into the contemporary global race discourse - a discourse largely dominated to date by discussions of African Americans and American Indians in the United States. Cowlishaw's work broadens and enriches discussions of the dramas of a racialized world.".

Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 254-263) and index.

Subjects Aboriginal Australians -- New South Wales -- Bourke -- Social conditions.  |  Aboriginal Australians -- New South Wales -- Bourke -- Ethnic identity.  |  Blacks -- Race identity -- New South Wales -- Bourke.  |  Whites -- Race identity -- New South Wales -- Bourke.  |  Riots -- New South Wales -- Bourke.  |  Racism -- New South Wales -- Bourke.  |  Race relations - Racism - Stereotyping.  |  Race relations - Violent.  |  Bourke (N.S.W.) -- Social conditions.  |  Bourke (N.S.W.) -- Race relations.  |  Murdi Paaki / Bourke (N NSW SH55-10)
000 03134cam a22004098a 4500
001 3070669
005 20180831102809.0
008 030408s2004    maub     b    001 0 eng  
010 |a2003008051
019 1 |a26329523
020 |a1405114037 (alk. paper)
020 |a1405114045 (pbk. : alk. paper)
035 |a3070669
040 |aDLC|cDLC|dDLC|dANL
042 |aanuc|apcc
043 |au-at-ne
050 0 0 |aGN667.N5|bC68 2004
082 0 0 |a305.80099448|222
100 1 |aCowlishaw, Gillian K.|q(Gillian Keir),|d1934-
245 1 0 |aBlackfellas, whitefellas, and the hidden injuries of race /|cGillian Cowlishaw.
260 |aMalden, Mass. :|bBlackwell Pub.,|c2004.
300 |axvi, 272 p. :|bmaps ;|c24 cm.
504 |aIncludes bibliographical references (p. 254-263) and index.
520 8 |a"In the first half of Blackfellas, Whitefellas, and the Hidden Injuries of Race Cowlishaw uses the talk of the town to uncover the complicated story of that hot summer night. Local and national meanings of the riot are exposed and the entrenched racial binary evident in everyday relationships is explored. In the second half of the book, Cowlishaw raises questions about history/memory, citizenship/respect, and interpellation/abjection as means of considering the politics, social science, and psychology of race rivalry and indigenous marginality." "Written both for beginners and those well-versed in contemporary debates, Blackfellas, Whitefellas, and the Hidden Injuries of Race introduces new readers to key theories of race relations and offers more seasoned readers her fresh perspective on racial and Aboriginal politics."--BOOK JACKET.
520 1 |a"In December 1997, in a small town in rural Australia, a fight broke out among local Aborigines that turned into a full-blown riot when police intervened in force. In Blackfellas, Whitefellas, and the Hidden Injuries of Race, anthropologist Gillian Cowlishaw uses this vivid incident as a means of launching a larger discussion about race, identity, and racialized violence. In this lively, highly readable ethnography, Cowlishaw brings indigenous Australians into the contemporary global race discourse - a discourse largely dominated to date by discussions of African Americans and American Indians in the United States. Cowlishaw's work broadens and enriches discussions of the dramas of a racialized world.".
650 0 |aAboriginal Australians|zNew South Wales|zBourke|xSocial conditions.
650 0 |aAboriginal Australians|zNew South Wales|zBourke|xEthnic identity.
650 0 |aBlacks|xRace identity|zNew South Wales|zBourke.
650 0 |aWhites|xRace identity|zNew South Wales|zBourke.
650 0 |aRiots|zNew South Wales|zBourke.
650 0 |aRacism|zNew South Wales|zBourke.
650 7 |aRace relations - Racism - Stereotyping.|2aiatsiss
650 7 |aRace relations - Violent.|2aiatsiss
651 0 |aBourke (N.S.W.)|xSocial conditions.
651 0 |aBourke (N.S.W.)|xRace relations.
651 7 |aMurdi Paaki / Bourke (N NSW SH55-10)|2aiatsisp
856 4 1 |3Table of contents|uhttp://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip042/2003008051.html
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.