National Library of Australia

The National Library building is closed temporarily until further notice, in line with ACT Government COVID-19 health restrictions.
Find out more

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Anti-realism, anti-holism and rejection (Michael Dummett, Robert Brandom) [microform]
Bib ID 3284197
Format MicroformMicroform, BookBook
Author
Gibbard, Peter John
 
Description 154 p. 
ISBN 0493278621
Summary

Durnmett's suspicions about classical logic are based upon his view that a theory of meaning is adequate only if it is (in Durnmett's sense) a use theory. His critics have emphasized, however, that there are a variety of use theories that generate classical logic. To ascertain whether these critics succeed against Dummett, we need to consider a second demand he places on a theory of meaning--what we might call his anti-holism demand. The anti-holism demand says that a theory of meaning is adequate for the purpose of justifying deduction only if the theory does not exhibit a certain type of holism--a holism about the meanings of the logical constants. The problem is that Dummett's characterizations of the content and motivation of the anti-holism demand are notoriously unclear. In Chapter Two, I specify a motivation for the anti-holism demand--a specification that is at least inspired by Dummett's writings on logical holism.

This allows a characterization of the anti-holism demand that is sufficiently precise for the task of Chapter Three: to present Dummettian criticisms of various justifications of classical logic that employ use theories of meaning. Chapters Four, Five and Six contain the positive part of the project--to construct a use theory that satisfies Dummett's anti-holism demand. Brandom rejects Dummett's anti-holism demand because he thinks that any use theory that satisfies the demand will possess a certain defect. And Dummett himself, in moments of self-scrutiny, expresses reasons to be pessimistic about the possibility of constructing a use theory satisfying the anti-holism demand. In Chapter Five, I argue that Brandom's and Durnmett's pessimism is unfounded. The strategy is to construct what I call a dualist theory --a theory that generates not only the assertion conditions of sentences but also their rejection conditions.

Chapter Six provides a more technical presentation of the dualist theory.

Notes

(UnM)AAI3016848

Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 62-06, Section: A, page: 2134.

Chair: Jamie Tappenden.

Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Michigan, 2001.

Reproduction Microfiche. Ann Arbor, Mich.: University Microfilms International. 
Subjects Philosophy.
Other authors/contributors University of Michigan

Online

    In the Library

    Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

    Details Collect From
    mc 252 30-16848 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History

    Order a copy

    - Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

    Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
    close Can I borrow items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close What can I get online?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
    Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.