National Library of Australia

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Ken Buckley interviewed by Ann Turner [sound recording]
Bib ID 335612
Format AudioAudio, OnlineOnline [sound recording]
Author
Buckley, Ken (Kenneth Donald), 1922-2006, Interviewee
 
Online Versions
Access Conditions Access open for research, personal copies and public use. 
Description 1994 
1 digital audio tape (ca. 88 min.) 
Summary

Ken Buckley, historian, ex-Communist, political activist and Professor of Economic History, University of Sydney, 1961-1988, speaks of his English working class family background, impact of the outbreak of WWII on his education, enlisting in the Army at 19, serving as a British officer in Greece, after returning to England in 1946 he joined the League of Democracy in Greece and the Committee for Cypriot Self-Determination, joining the Communist Party in 1942 in order to further socialist change, resigning in 1956 as a result of Krushchev's speech against Stalin and the Russian invasion of Hungary, graduating in 1948 and lecturing at Aberdeen University until taking a post at Sydney University, emigrating in 1953, how he became Federal Secretary of the Federal Council of Australian University Staff Association (FCAUSA) which protected members against political discrimination, how ASIO vetted appointments at the University of New South Wales, member of editorial board of the journal Outlook which catered for disillusioned Marxists.

Buckley speaks of joining the Communist Party of Australia (CPA) in 1954, along with Dick Klugman and Jack Sweeney he founded the Council for Civil Liberties (CCL) in Sept. 1963 in an attempt to counter corruption by the police, how the Council provided free legal aid for citizens whose human rights had been violated, being indicted for Vietnam War protests, how there was no solidarity among unions or CPA for the work of the CCL, why few academics are prepared to speak out for freedom of speech and the role of ASIO in suppressing left-wing views, the contention over the teaching of political economy in the 1960's and 70's, retired in 1989, his publications and editing of Labour History.

Notes

Recorded on Feb. 17, 1994 in Sydney.

Also available online http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-204813167

Index/Finding Aid Note Timed summary and corrected transcript (typescript, 37 leaves) available. 
Subjects Buckley, Ken (Kenneth Donald), 1922- 2006 -- Interviews.  |  Communist Party of Australia -- History.  |  Australian Council for Civil Liberties -- History.  |  Historians -- Australia -- Interviews.  |  Political activists -- Australia -- Interviews.
Other authors/contributors Turner, Ann, 1929-2011, Interviewer

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
ORAL TRC 3018
Copy: Recording
Special Collections Reading Room
ORAL TRC 3018 (transcript)
Copy: Transcript
Special Collections Reading Room
ORAL TRC 3018 (summary)
Copy: Summary
Special Collections Reading Room

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.