National Library of Australia

You must be logged in to Tag Records
A test of the multiregional hypothesis of modern human origins using basicranial evidence from Indonesia and Australia (Homo erectus). [microform]
Bib ID 3664884
Format MicroformMicroform, BookBook
Author
Durband, Arthur C
 
Description 174 p. 
ISBN 0496170708
Summary

Proponents of the Multiregional Hypothesis of modern human origins have consistently stated that the material from Australasia provides one of the most compelling examples of regional continuity in the human fossil record. According to these workers, features found in the earliest Homo erectus fossils from Java can be traced through more advanced hominids from Ngandong and are found in both fossil and recent Australian Aborigines. For this study, non-metric observations will be used to determine the degree of similarity between earlier Homo erectus from Sangiran, the Ngandong fossils (including the Sambungmacan hominids), and fossil/modern Australian Aborigines in the cranial base. This study will examine the hypothesis that a number of non-metric features will show an overall similarity between these samples, and will reject this hypothesis if it can be shown that significant dissimilarity exists between these groups.

The results of this project highlight a suite of features on the cranial base in the Ngandong sample that appear to be unique to that group. These morphologies include a dual foramen ovale, the location of the squamotympanic fissure, the small size and parallel orientation of the occipital condyles, and the marked expression of the postcondyloid tuberosities. The presence of these autapomorphic characters in the Ngandong population, in conjunction with previous work on the Pleistocene paleoecology of Java, suggests that multiple hominid species inhabited that island during the Pleistocene. This work also provides strong evidence of discontinuity between Indonesian Homo erectus and the earliest Homo sapiens in the Australasian fossil record.

Notes

(UnM)AAI3156518

Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 65-12, Section: A, page: 4621.

Major Professor: Andrew Kramer.

Thesis (Ph.D.)--The University of Tennessee, 2004.

Reproduction Microfiche. Ann Arbor, Mich. : University Microfilms International. 
Subjects Anthropology, Physical.
Other authors/contributors The University of Tennessee

Online

    In the Library

    Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

    Details Collect From
    mc 252 31-56518 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History

    Order a copy

    - Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

    Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
    close Can I borrow items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close What can I get online?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
    Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.