National Library of Australia

Reopening Update - August 2020: Enjoy a CovidSafe visit to the National Library. Read more...

<< Previous record
Record 173 of 173
You must be logged in to Tag Records
The continuing relevance of the Constitution for Indigenous peoples [electronic resource] / Professor Mick Dodson
Bib ID 4587843
Format OnlineOnline
Author
Dodson, Michael, 1950-
 
Online Access
Description Canberra, A.C.T. : National Archives of Australia, 2008 
Series

PANDORA electronic collection

Technical Details

System requirements: Macromedia Flash required to view video; MP3 required for audio file 

Summary

Transcript and video of Professor Michael Dodson's 13 July 2008 talk, held during NAIDOC Week at the National Archives of Australia as part of their "Talks on the Constitution"; Professor Dodson contrasts the recognition of Indigenous peoples in the treaties/constitutions of Canada, New Zealand and the United States of America to the underlying philosophy of Australia's relationship and its Constitution being 'predicated on exclusion' of Indigenous Australians - historically, Indigenous Australians had been seen as a dying race rather than as peoples or citizens, or individual members of a society or a nation; despite the importance of the 1967 Referendum, any mention of the existence of Indigenous Australians was removed from the Constitution at this time; Professor Dodson believes the Constitution remains relevant to Indigenous peoples as 'unfinished business', and that the Constitution is an opportunity to 'reconcile politically and spiritually with the Australian people and develop a shared sense of national identity'; in amending the Australian Constitution, he believes the key international principles of human rights, of equality, non-discrimination and the prohibition of racial discrimination should be entrenched in the document.

Notes

Title from website (viewed 26/2/09)

Text video/audio.

Selected for archiving

Subjects Constitutional amendments -- Australia.  |  Discrimination -- Law and legislation.  |  Indigenous peoples -- Human rights.  |  Preambles (Law) -- Australia.  |  Racism -- Government policy -- Australia.  |  Law - Constitutional law - Treaty movement.  |  Law - Constitutional law - Constitutional reform.  |  Law - International law - Human rights.  |  Law - International law - UN conventions.  |  Politics and Government - National symbols and events - Apologies.  |  Politics and Government - Referenda - Referendum, 1967.  |  Law - Constitutional law - Treaty movement.  |  Law - Constitutional law - Constitutional reform.  |  Law - International law - UN conventions.  |  Law - International law - Human rights.  |  Politics and Government - Referenda - Referendum, 1967.  |  Politics and Government - National symbols and events - Apologies.

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
Internet Use 'Online Access' link in record -

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.