National Library of Australia

You must be logged in to Tag Records
The art of arrow cutting / Stephen Dedman
Bib ID 46505
Format BookBook
Author
Dedman, Stephen
 
Edition 1st ed. 
Description New York : Tor, 1997 
285 pages ; 22 cm. 
ISBN 0312863209 (acid-free paper)
Summary

Mage. His name is actually Michelangelo Magistrale, but that's too long a moniker for a tough Brooklyn guy. Like his namesake, he's an artist - a photographer. He's been traveling a lot, trying to find where he fits in, when he makes an acquaintance in a Greyhound bus terminal that changes his life. Her name's Amanda, and the magic Mage feels is nothing more than the heat that any beautiful young woman could generate. But when she gives Mage the key to her apartment in exchange for ticket money, he gets more than he bargained for. The key, attached to a strangely beautiful braided lanyard, turns out to be real magic. And, unfortunately, trouble comes along with it. First come the kind of monsters Mage can understand: big, beefy guys with hard fists. Then a bakemono - nothing but a head and a pair of hands - tries to kill him.

It turns out that the yakuza - the Japanese mob - had their hooks in Amanda, and now they're after Mage. Lucky for him he meets Charlie Takumo, a guy who knows something about the yakuza and about weird Japanese creatures and sorcery that are supposed to be nothing but myth but turn out to be horribly real.

Notes

"A Tom Doherty Associates book."

A novel.

Subjects Photographers -- Fiction.  |  Yakuza -- Fiction.
Form/genre Science fiction.
000 01960cam a2200313 a 4500
001 46505
005 20180905180811.0
008 961223s1997    nyu           00001 eng  
010 |a96053282
019 1 |a12953058
020 |a0312863209|qacid-free paper
035 |9(AuCNLDY)2479535
035 |a46505
040 |aANL|beng|dANL
050 0 0 |aPR9619.3.D387|bA89 1997
082 0 0 |a823|221
100 1 |aDedman, Stephen.
245 1 4 |aThe art of arrow cutting /|cStephen Dedman.
250 |a1st ed.
260 |aNew York :|bTor,|c1997.
300 |a285 pages ;|c22 cm.
500 |a"A Tom Doherty Associates book."
500 |aA novel.
520 |aMage. His name is actually Michelangelo Magistrale, but that's too long a moniker for a tough Brooklyn guy. Like his namesake, he's an artist - a photographer. He's been traveling a lot, trying to find where he fits in, when he makes an acquaintance in a Greyhound bus terminal that changes his life. Her name's Amanda, and the magic Mage feels is nothing more than the heat that any beautiful young woman could generate. But when she gives Mage the key to her apartment in exchange for ticket money, he gets more than he bargained for. The key, attached to a strangely beautiful braided lanyard, turns out to be real magic. And, unfortunately, trouble comes along with it. First come the kind of monsters Mage can understand: big, beefy guys with hard fists. Then a bakemono - nothing but a head and a pair of hands - tries to kill him.
520 8 |aIt turns out that the yakuza - the Japanese mob - had their hooks in Amanda, and now they're after Mage. Lucky for him he meets Charlie Takumo, a guy who knows something about the yakuza and about weird Japanese creatures and sorcery that are supposed to be nothing but myth but turn out to be horribly real.
650 0 |aPhotographers|xFiction.
650 0 |aYakuza|xFiction.
655 7 |aScience fiction.|2mim
984 |aANL|cN 823 D299ar
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.