National Library of Australia

We’re delighted to be able to re-open the Library for pre-booked ticketed access to our collections. Read more...

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 73 of 212
You must be logged in to Tag Records
US public diplomacy in the Asia-Pacific [electronic resource] : opportunities and challenges in a time of transition / Sarah Ellen Graham
Bib ID 5154379
Format BookBook, OnlineOnline
Author
Graham, Sarah Ellen
 
Online Access
Online Versions
Description Canberra : Dept. of International Relations, Australian National University, 2007 
57 p. 
ISBN 9780731531516
Series

Working paper (Australian National University. Dept. of International Relations : Online), 1834-8351 ; 2007/6.

PANDORA electronic collection.

Technical Details

Mode of access: Internet via World Wide Web. Address as at 11/04/2011: http://ips.cap.anu.edu.au/ir/pubs/work_papers/07-6.pdf. 

System requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader to access the document in PDF format. 

Summary

Two key themes stand out within current US government reports and foreign policy commentaries on American public diplomacy. These are: firstly, that US efforts to attract 'hearts and minds' in the Middle East were inadequate before and immediately after the 11 September 2001 attacks on America and must be improved, and secondly that the administration of public diplomacy has required major reform in order to meet the challenge of engaging Arab and Muslim audiences into the future. This paper assesses US public diplomacy in a regional context that has not been subject to significant scrutiny within the post-11 September debates on US public diplomacy: the Asia-Pacific. This oversight is lamentable, given Washington's significant security and economic interests in the Asia-Pacific, and because the Asia-Pacific is a region undergoing significant economic, diplomatic and political shifts that are likely to complicate Washington's ability to bring about desired outcomes in the future. This paper demonstrates, furthermore, that the Asia-Pacific represents an important case study from which to reflect on the administrative and substantive questions raised in recent critiques of US public diplomacy at a general level.

Notes

Title from title screen (viewed on April 11, 2011)

"December 2007".

Includes bibliographical references.

Text.

Selected for archiving

Subjects Diplomacy.  |  United States -- Foreign relations -- Asia.  |  United States -- Foreign relations -- Pacific Area.  |  Diplomacy  |  Foreign policy  |  International relations  |  United States  |  Pacific Rim  |  Asia  |  History  |  Organisational change  |  Overseas item
Other authors/contributors Australian National University. Department of International Relations

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
Internet Use 'Online Resources' link in record -

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.