National Library of Australia

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 119 of 151
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Fact sheet on nonwhite women workers [microform]
Bib ID 5188348
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1966 
2 p. 
Summary

Recent social, economic, and political developments have helped to improve the status of nonwhite women workers, but there are still substantial differences in the employment patterns of nonwhite and white women. A higher percentage of nonwhites are in the labor force and are working wives and working mothers. In general, nonwhites have higher unemployment rates, lower income, and less schooling than whites, and more are concentrated in low-skilled, low-wage occupations. The 3.5 million in the labor force in 1965 were 46 percent of all nonwhite women. Of those women with children 6-17 years of age, 58 percent of the nonwhites were workers. They were in all major occupational groups. Thirty percent were in private household work, 25 percent in service work, and 11 percent in clerical work. About 30 percent were on part-time schedules but preferred full-time. Almost 67 percent of nonwhite women reported some income in 1964. The median was $1,066 while that of full-time, year-round workers was $2,674. About 324,000 nonwhite women were seeking work in 1965. The median number of school years completed by nonwhite women workers 18 years and over in March 1965 was 11.1 years. Thirty-two percent had completed 8 years or less of schooling, 29 percent had completed high school, and 8 percent had graduated from college. Sources of these data are the U.S. Department of commerce, bureau of census, and the U.S. Department of Labor, bureau of labor statistics. (fp)

Notes

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Employed Women.  |  Employment Patterns.  |  Individual Characteristics.  |  Labor Force.  |  Racial Characteristics.  |  Unemployment.
Other authors/contributors Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED015280 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.