National Library of Australia

Enjoy a CovidSafe visit to the National Library. Read more...

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 2 of 156
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Education for Creativity, A Modern Myth? [microform] / Paul Heist, Ed
Bib ID 5198067
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
California Univ., Berkeley. Center for Research and Development in Higher Education
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1967 
174 p. 
Summary

The paucity of meaningful academic experiences for potentially or highly creative individuals prompted researchers and performing artists to meet and discuss the implications for creative opportunities in higher education. A truly creative person is thought to be independent, innovative, flexible, with a highly developed sense of the theoretical and the esthetic, and exercises discipline only when he considers it necessary. A rigidly structured and organized academic system invariably discourages self-expression. Consequently, a number of students transfer from or drop out of educational systems too formalized for their tastes. Unfortunately, academe generally assumes that educational needs of all unusual students are met in programs designed for the gifted or exceptional, and many creative individuals who do not meet necessary academic requirements are excluded or ignored. Many questions were raised to which answers could not be provided but participants agreed that very little research has been done on creativity at the college level, except in the creative arts. The task ahead involves learning about the nature and forms of creativity, establishing whether it is innate or may be developed. Then programs should focus on quality education for the total human being, and be flexible enough to stimulate and encourage creative expression. A bibliography of related publications is included. (WM)

Notes

Contract Number: OEC-6-10-106.

Educational level discussed: Higher Education.

ERIC Note: Proceedings of a Conference on Education for Creativity in the American College, Berkeley, California, Spring 1966.

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Academic Standards.  |  Educational Change.  |  Self Expression.  |  Student Motivation.  |  Talent Utilization.  |  Creative Development.  |  Creative Expression.  |  Creativity.  |  Educational Objectives.  |  Higher Education.
Other authors/contributors Heist, Paul, editor  |  California Univ., Berkeley. Center for Research and Development in Higher Education
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED025999 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.