National Library of Australia

Due to major building activity some of our collections are temporarily unavailable. Please check the catalogue carefully to find out if your selection is impacted.  Learn more

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 7 of 14
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Educational Opportunity, Democratic Theory, and the Economics of Educational Subsidy [microform] / John D. Owen
Bib ID 5198650
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Owen, John D
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1968 
11 p. 
Summary

Subsidies to education are often justified by arguing that society derives political benefits from education in terms of individuals who perform better as citizens. Since these benefits are external to the student and therefore do not provide him with incentive to invest further in his education, society must devise a means of subsidy that will induce students to continue their education and thereby improve the workings of political democracy. Many argue that an optimal subsidy policy is one which stimulates the student's private economic motive for demanding education. By offering cheap tuition or providing loans at subsidized rates of interest, the consequent cost reductions lead to a greater demand for education. However, such across-the-board cost reductions stimulate investment in education among the more able students and lead to greater investment in training for higher paid occupations, where the private incentives are highest. The logic of majority voting indicates that a more efficient method by which to gain citizenship benefits from education might be through a more egalitarian subsidy policy which would allocate larger subsidies to less able students. Moreover, some selectivity in the areas of study to be supported is desirable, since some courses may be more effective than others in improving citizenship quality. (TT)

Notes

Contract Number: OEG-2-7-061610-0207.

Sponsoring Agency: Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC. Bureau of Research.

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Democracy.  |  Educational Demand.  |  Equal Education.  |  Political Socialization.  |  Student Loan Programs.  |  Tuition Grants.  |  Citizenship.  |  Educational Opportunities.  |  Federal Aid.  |  Financial Support.  |  State Aid.
Other authors/contributors Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD. Center for the Study of Social Organization of Schools
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED026722 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.