National Library of Australia

Enjoy a CovidSafe visit to the National Library. Read more...

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Making T. S. Eliot Relevant [microform] / Jean C. Sisk
Bib ID 5203096
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Sisk, Jean C
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1969 
9 p. 
Summary

Able 11th- and 12th-grade students can enjoy the imagery, direct language, and indirect thought of T. S. Eliot. Eliot's treatment of the apathetic society and the isolated individual, his concern for spirituality over sensuality, and his plea for collective responsibility for evil are themes that can be traced in his major works through formalistic and historical criticism. Simon and Garfunkel's "Dangling Conversation" can introduce students to the isolation and ineffectuality of "The Hollow Men." A comparison between what students expect to find in a love song and what they find in "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" can lead the students into the message of the poem. An in-depth study of the relationship of "Murder in the Cathedral" to Greek drama and medieval morality plays, as well as intensive work in diction and prosody, can be rewarding. Oral reading of Eliot's works can illustrate one of his recurring ideas--modern man's apathy because of a need for spiritual values. Once the central themes have been established, students can broaden their understanding by reading thematically similar works by other writers, such as Camus, Kafka, and Yeats. (LH)

Notes

Educational level discussed: Secondary Education.

Maryland English Journal, v7 n2 p17-21+ Spring 1969.

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Choral Speaking.  |  Figurative Language.  |  Formal Criticism.  |  Historical Criticism.  |  Imagery.  |  Irony.  |  Literary Devices.  |  Literary Influences.  |  Literature Appreciation.  |  Metaphors.  |  Secondary Education.  |  Social Values.  |  Twentieth Century Literature.  |  English Instruction.  |  Literary Criticism.  |  Poetry.  |  Teaching Methods.  |  Eliot (T S)
Available From ERIC 
000 02846cam a22004812u 4500
001 5203096
005 20181017113013.0
007 he u||024||||
008 080220s1969    xxu ||| b     ||| | eng d
035 |9(ericd)ED032301
035 |a5203096
037 |aED032301|bERIC
040 |aericd|beng|cericd|dMvI
091 |amfm
100 1 |aSisk, Jean C.
245 1 0 |aMaking T. S. Eliot Relevant|h[microform] /|cJean C. Sisk.
260 |a[Washington, D.C.] :|bDistributed by ERIC Clearinghouse,|c1969.
300 |a9 p.
500 |aEducational level discussed: Secondary Education.
520 |aAble 11th- and 12th-grade students can enjoy the imagery, direct language, and indirect thought of T. S. Eliot. Eliot's treatment of the apathetic society and the isolated individual, his concern for spirituality over sensuality, and his plea for collective responsibility for evil are themes that can be traced in his major works through formalistic and historical criticism. Simon and Garfunkel's "Dangling Conversation" can introduce students to the isolation and ineffectuality of "The Hollow Men." A comparison between what students expect to find in a love song and what they find in "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" can lead the students into the message of the poem. An in-depth study of the relationship of "Murder in the Cathedral" to Greek drama and medieval morality plays, as well as intensive work in diction and prosody, can be rewarding. Oral reading of Eliot's works can illustrate one of his recurring ideas--modern man's apathy because of a need for spiritual values. Once the central themes have been established, students can broaden their understanding by reading thematically similar works by other writers, such as Camus, Kafka, and Yeats. (LH)
524 |aMaryland English Journal, v7 n2 p17-21+ Spring 1969.|2ericd
530 |aMay also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: |uhttps://eric.ed.gov/
533 |aMicrofiche.|b[Washington D.C.]:|cERIC Clearinghouse|emicrofiches : positive.
650 0 7 |aChoral Speaking.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aFigurative Language.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aFormal Criticism.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aHistorical Criticism.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aImagery.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aIrony.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aLiterary Devices.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aLiterary Influences.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aLiterature Appreciation.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aMetaphors.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aSecondary Education.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aSocial Values.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aTwentieth Century Literature.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aEnglish Instruction.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aLiterary Criticism.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aPoetry.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aTeaching Methods.|2ericd
653 1 |aEliot (T S)
856 4 1 |uhttps://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED032301
984 |aANL|cmc 2253 ED032301|d77000000043313
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.