National Library of Australia

Enjoy a CovidSafe visit to the National Library. Read more...

You must be logged in to Tag Records
The Effect of Mode of Feedback in Microteaching [microform] / Joe E. Shively and Others
Bib ID 5207136
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Shively, Joe E
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1970 
13 p. 
Summary

A study examined the effects on teacher performance and attitudes of several manipulations of the conditions under which the microteaching supervisor provides feedback: he bases his critique on (1) a videotape of the microteaching lesson which he views with the microteaching teacher (VT group); (2) an audiotape instead (AT group); (3) his experience with the live lesson (LL group); or (4) the responses of the microteaching student to the Stanford Teacher Competence Appraisal Guide (STCAG)(SR group). All students in a basic educational psychology course (N=37) were randomly assigned to eight groups, two groups randomly assigned to each treatment. Data was obtained from STCAG scores and an attitude scale measuring attitudes toward various aspects of the microteaching experience. Analyses of covariance indicated significant differences in students' ratings of the performance of subjects within the four treatments on all 13 variables. Major findings: The AT treatment appears to be the strongest, resulting in the greatest amount of change as measured by student ratings and also being highly valued by the microteaching teachers. The SR treatment effectively produced change in teacher performance but was not highly valued. The VT treatment appeared relatively weak in producing change yet was highly valued. The LL treatment appears least effective and tends to be lowly valued. (JS)

Notes

ERIC Note: Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Minneapolis, March 1970.

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Education Majors.  |  Educational Psychology.  |  Feedback.  |  Microteaching.  |  Supervisory Methods.  |  Teacher Supervision.
Available From ERIC 
000 02636cam a22003252u 4500
001 5207136
005 20181012145216.0
007 he u||024||||
008 080220s1970    xxu ||| b     ||| | eng d
035 |9(ericd)ED037391
035 |a5207136
037 |aED037391|bERIC
040 |aericd|beng|cericd|dMvI
091 |amfm
100 1 |aShively, Joe E.
245 1 4 |aThe Effect of Mode of Feedback in Microteaching|h[microform] /|cJoe E. Shively and Others.
260 |a[Washington, D.C.] :|bDistributed by ERIC Clearinghouse,|c1970.
300 |a13 p.
500 |aERIC Note: Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Minneapolis, March 1970.|5ericd
520 |aA study examined the effects on teacher performance and attitudes of several manipulations of the conditions under which the microteaching supervisor provides feedback: he bases his critique on (1) a videotape of the microteaching lesson which he views with the microteaching teacher (VT group); (2) an audiotape instead (AT group); (3) his experience with the live lesson (LL group); or (4) the responses of the microteaching student to the Stanford Teacher Competence Appraisal Guide (STCAG)(SR group). All students in a basic educational psychology course (N=37) were randomly assigned to eight groups, two groups randomly assigned to each treatment. Data was obtained from STCAG scores and an attitude scale measuring attitudes toward various aspects of the microteaching experience. Analyses of covariance indicated significant differences in students' ratings of the performance of subjects within the four treatments on all 13 variables. Major findings: The AT treatment appears to be the strongest, resulting in the greatest amount of change as measured by student ratings and also being highly valued by the microteaching teachers. The SR treatment effectively produced change in teacher performance but was not highly valued. The VT treatment appeared relatively weak in producing change yet was highly valued. The LL treatment appears least effective and tends to be lowly valued. (JS)
530 |aMay also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: |uhttps://eric.ed.gov/
533 |aMicrofiche.|b[Washington D.C.]:|cERIC Clearinghouse|emicrofiches : positive.
650 0 7 |aEducation Majors.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aEducational Psychology.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aFeedback.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aMicroteaching.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aSupervisory Methods.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aTeacher Supervision.|2ericd
856 4 1 |uhttps://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED037391
984 |aANL|cmc 2253 ED037391|d77000000047351
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.