National Library of Australia

Enjoy a CovidSafe visit to the National Library. Read more...

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Relationship of Thought Processes to Language Responses in Disadvantaged Children. Final Report [microform] / Sara W. Lundsteen and Benjamin Fruchter
Bib ID 5207196
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Lundsteen, Sara W
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1969 
49 p. 
Summary

The objectives of this study were to determine the strength and importance of the relationships among features of oral and written language proficiency and their accompanying thought processes, and to dimensionalize variables that may be manipulated to assist development of disadvantaged children. Test scores from measures of language/thinking proficiency, such as problem solving, listening, abstract quality of thinking, and reading achievement (15 variables in all), were collected from 312 fifth-grade students randomly placed in experimental and control groups, who had completed all pretests and post-tests, and from 153 sixth-grade students who had completed retention tests. Experimental-group children had received instruction in problem solving, listening, and abstract thinking. The major method of statistical analysis consisted of principal-axis factor analysis of the 15 variables, with varimax and oblique rotation. Results showed that three factors could be extracted and interpreted--reading achievement, verbal abstract thinking, and problem solving. An implication of the study was that socioeconomic status, possibly more than I.Q., is a crucial influence on reading performance. (Author/JM)

Notes

Contract Number: OEG-7-9-530077-0111-(010).

Sponsoring Agency: Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC. Bureau of Research.

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Divergent Thinking.  |  Language Usage.  |  Listening Skills.  |  Measurement.  |  Problem Solving.  |  Abstract Reasoning.  |  Cognitive Processes.  |  Disadvantaged Youth.  |  Language Proficiency.  |  Reading Achievement.
Other authors/contributors Fruchter, Benjamin, author  |  Texas Univ., Austin
Available From ERIC 
000 02798cam a22004092u 4500
001 5207196
005 20181012145217.0
007 he u||024||||
008 080220s1969    xxu ||| b     ||| | eng d
035 |9(ericd)ED037462
035 |a5207196
037 |aED037462|bERIC
040 |aericd|beng|cericd|dMvI
091 |amfm
100 1 |aLundsteen, Sara W.
245 1 0 |aRelationship of Thought Processes to Language Responses in Disadvantaged Children. Final Report|h[microform] /|cSara W. Lundsteen and Benjamin Fruchter.
260 |a[Washington, D.C.] :|bDistributed by ERIC Clearinghouse,|c1969.
300 |a49 p.
500 |aContract Number: OEG-7-9-530077-0111-(010).|5ericd
500 |aSponsoring Agency: Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC. Bureau of Research.|5ericd
520 |aThe objectives of this study were to determine the strength and importance of the relationships among features of oral and written language proficiency and their accompanying thought processes, and to dimensionalize variables that may be manipulated to assist development of disadvantaged children. Test scores from measures of language/thinking proficiency, such as problem solving, listening, abstract quality of thinking, and reading achievement (15 variables in all), were collected from 312 fifth-grade students randomly placed in experimental and control groups, who had completed all pretests and post-tests, and from 153 sixth-grade students who had completed retention tests. Experimental-group children had received instruction in problem solving, listening, and abstract thinking. The major method of statistical analysis consisted of principal-axis factor analysis of the 15 variables, with varimax and oblique rotation. Results showed that three factors could be extracted and interpreted--reading achievement, verbal abstract thinking, and problem solving. An implication of the study was that socioeconomic status, possibly more than I.Q., is a crucial influence on reading performance. (Author/JM)
530 |aMay also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: |uhttps://eric.ed.gov/
533 |aMicrofiche.|b[Washington D.C.]:|cERIC Clearinghouse|emicrofiches : positive.
650 0 7 |aDivergent Thinking.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aLanguage Usage.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aListening Skills.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aMeasurement.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aProblem Solving.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aAbstract Reasoning.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aCognitive Processes.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aDisadvantaged Youth.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aLanguage Proficiency.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aReading Achievement.|2ericd
700 1 |aFruchter, Benjamin,|eauthor.
710 2 |aTexas Univ., Austin.
856 4 1 |uhttps://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED037462
984 |aANL|cmc 2253 ED037462|d77000000047410
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.