National Library of Australia

Due to the need to contain the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19) the Library building and reading rooms are closed to visitors until further notice.
The health and safety of our community is of great importance to us and we look forward to staying connected with you online.

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Language Development of Socially Disadvantaged Preschool Children. Final Report [microform] / Hazel Leler
Bib ID 5210664
Format MicroformMicroform, BookBook
Author
Leler, Hazel
 
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1970 
127 p. 
Summary

The relationship between various aspects of mother-child interaction and the language performance of young disadvantaged Negro children is assessed in this study. An exploratory survey was conducted to determine if mothers in socially disadvantaged families were willing to enter a parent participation preschool program. Subjects for this study, selected from families who were willing to participate, were 53 children ages 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 years, second or later in birth order, and their mothers. Data were collected by language testing and by structured order, and their mothers. Data were collected by language testing and by structured observation of mother-child interaction scored by two raters on various scales. Significant positive correlations were found between the language test scores and the mothers' acceptance, use of praise, and rewarding of independence, and the child's independence and verbal initiative. Mothers' negative actions such as use of criticism and discouragement of verbalizations were reflected in children's lower scores in language performance. Some sex differences were shown in test scores and in mother-child interaction. Much variation was shown among the sample children. Recommendations are given for the use of the measure of Mean Length of Utterance. (NH)

Notes

Contract Number: OEC-6-10-324.

Sponsoring Agency: Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC. Bureau of Research.

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Language Fluency.  |  Language Tests.  |  Parent Participation.  |  Sex Differences.  |  Skill Development.  |  Verbal Communication.  |  Disadvantaged.  |  Language Acquisition.  |  Mother Attitudes.  |  Parent Child Relationship.  |  Preschool Children.  |  Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test
Other authors/contributors Stanford Univ., CA
Available From ERIC 

Online

    In the Library

    Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

    Details Collect From
    mc 2253 ED041641 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
    This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

    Order a copy

    - Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

    Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
    close Can I borrow items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close What can I get online?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
    Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.