National Library of Australia

Enjoy a CovidSafe visit to the National Library. Read more...

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 17 of 23
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Listen, My Children, and You Shall Read [microform] / Edmund J. Farrell
Bib ID 5226984
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Farrell, Edmund J
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1966 
8 p. 
Summary

Two main points are stressed in this essay: (1) Reading literature aloud to students is not only educationally sound, but for many youngsters, necessary; and (2) In order to help his students become critical listeners of the literature that is read to them, a teacher must build bridges between the youngsters' experience and that in the literature. Three types of spoken language are listed: reading aloud, monologue, and real conversation. The differences between the first two and conversation include: (1) The intonation patterns of spoken prose are highly standardized; those of conversation are not; (2) Spoken prose is even in tempo; conversation is not; and (3) The pauses of spoken prose are closely related to the grammatical structure of these sentences; in conversation, they are frequently unpredictable. To attune his ear, a student not only needs to hear his teachers read aloud a great deal, he also needs occasional practice himself. Listening comprehension in slow-learning children far exceeds reading comprehension for the following reasons: the speaking voice brings to interpretation pitch, stress, pause, rhythm, tone--audible clues to meaning which slow youngsters are unable to infer from print alone. It is suggested that television and film be used more often than they are to help slow learners, as these media combine visual and auditory clues to meaning. (CK)

Notes

English Journal, v55 n1 p39-45, 68 January 1966.

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Audiovisual Aids.  |  Aural Learning.  |  English Instruction.  |  Inquiry.  |  Listening Comprehension.  |  Literature Appreciation.  |  Mass Media.  |  Reading Comprehension.  |  Slow Learners.  |  Speech Communication.  |  Student Needs.  |  Teaching Methods.  |  Visual Learning.
Available From ERIC 
000 02803cam a22003972u 4500
001 5226984
005 20181018165714.0
007 he u||024||||
008 080220s1966    xxu ||| b     ||| | eng d
035 |9(ericd)ED058233
037 |aED058233|bERIC
040 |aericd|beng|cericd|dMvI
091 |amfm
100 1 |aFarrell, Edmund J.
245 1 0 |aListen, My Children, and You Shall Read|h[microform] /|cEdmund J. Farrell.
260 |a[Washington, D.C.] :|bDistributed by ERIC Clearinghouse,|c1966.
300 |a8 p.
520 |aTwo main points are stressed in this essay: (1) Reading literature aloud to students is not only educationally sound, but for many youngsters, necessary; and (2) In order to help his students become critical listeners of the literature that is read to them, a teacher must build bridges between the youngsters' experience and that in the literature. Three types of spoken language are listed: reading aloud, monologue, and real conversation. The differences between the first two and conversation include: (1) The intonation patterns of spoken prose are highly standardized; those of conversation are not; (2) Spoken prose is even in tempo; conversation is not; and (3) The pauses of spoken prose are closely related to the grammatical structure of these sentences; in conversation, they are frequently unpredictable. To attune his ear, a student not only needs to hear his teachers read aloud a great deal, he also needs occasional practice himself. Listening comprehension in slow-learning children far exceeds reading comprehension for the following reasons: the speaking voice brings to interpretation pitch, stress, pause, rhythm, tone--audible clues to meaning which slow youngsters are unable to infer from print alone. It is suggested that television and film be used more often than they are to help slow learners, as these media combine visual and auditory clues to meaning. (CK)
524 |aEnglish Journal, v55 n1 p39-45, 68 January 1966.|2ericd
530 |aMay also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18:|uhttps://eric.ed.gov/
533 |aMicrofiche.|b[Washington D.C.]:|cERIC Clearinghouse|emicrofiches : positive.
650 0 7 |aAudiovisual Aids.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aAural Learning.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aEnglish Instruction.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aInquiry.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aListening Comprehension.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aLiterature Appreciation.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aMass Media.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aReading Comprehension.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aSlow Learners.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aSpeech Communication.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aStudent Needs.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aTeaching Methods.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aVisual Learning.|2ericd
856 4 1 |uhttps://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED058233
984 |aANL|cmc 2253 ED058233|d77000000064119
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.