National Library of Australia

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 15 of 26
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Toward Integration Through Education [microform] : Dichotomies of Purposes and Processes / John S. Gibson
Bib ID 5229345
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Gibson, John S
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1971 
69 p. 
Summary

Beginning with the thesis that integrated education is indispensable to achieving an integrated society, the author examines first whether these assumptions behind school desegregation are valid or not, and why: that students will perform better academically, and that more democratic human relations will ensue. He presents evidence to show that racial mixes and interactions, without quality education, cannot and do not achieve these goals. The author then discusses four reasons for the inadequacies of integrated education: paradoxical teachers and teaching; patronizing curriculum; sterile instructional materials; and silent administrators. This is followed by an examination of the impact of these factors on different kinds of schools. In the third section of the paper, Toward Quality in Education, six components of quality education are proposed and discussed: a democratic school, quality teachers and teaching, integrated curriculum, authentic instructional resources, vigorous support from the school administration, and community-family-school relations. The caution is added that unless schools are joined by other social institutions, educational efforts toward an integrated society will have little effect. In conclusion, the author discusses some additional suggestions for advancing democratic human relations through education. (Author/JLB)

Notes

ERIC Note: Speech presented at the Annual Conference on Civil and Human Rights in Education, National Education Association, March 5, 1971.

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Academic Achievement.  |  Black Education.  |  Black Students.  |  Classroom Desegregation.  |  Desegregation Effects.  |  Desegregation Plans.  |  Educational Quality.  |  Equal Education.  |  Integration Studies.  |  Minority Group Children.  |  Racial Attitudes.  |  Racial Integration.  |  Racial Relations.  |  Racially Balanced Schools.  |  School Desegregation.  |  Social Integration.  |  Speeches.
Other authors/contributors Tufts Univ., Medford, MA. Lincoln Filene Center for Citizenship and Public Affairs
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED061111 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.