National Library of Australia

Enjoy a CovidSafe visit to the National Library. Read more...

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 9 of 47
You must be logged in to Tag Records
The Development of Awareness of the Black Standard [microform] : Black Nonstandard Dialect Contrast Among Primary School Children: A Pilot Study. Research and Development Memorandum Number 83 / Robert L. Politzer and Mary R. Hoover
Bib ID 5230526
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Politzer, Robert L
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1972 
22 p. 
Summary

This experiment deals with a test of auditory discrimination between standard Black English and nonstandard Black English. The test consists of two sections, one emphasizing phonological variables and the other emphasizing grammatical variables. It was administered to 83 black and 71 white children who were second, fourth, and sixth graders in schools attended primarily by children from lower to lower middle class socioeconomic backgrounds. The analysis of variance of the test results showed that: (a) test scores increased with maturation; (b) girls performed generally better than boys; and, (c) black children performed better than white children. For black children, achievement on the tests correlated significantly with scores on standardized reading achievement tests at all grade levels. For white children, the correlations were significant only at the sixth-grade level. The results of the experiment indicate that the awareness of the standard/nonstandard difference is more highly developed in black children than in white children--perhaps as a result of training, perhaps as a result of greater exposure to both standard and nonstandard black speech. They also suggest that for black children recognition of the difference is related to reading achievement in standard language from the beginning of their school career. (Author/JM)

Notes

Sponsoring Agency: Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.

Contract Number: OEC-6-10-078(Component 3A).

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Auditory Discrimination.  |  Black Dialects.  |  Black Students.  |  Elementary School Students.  |  Grammar.  |  Language Styles.  |  Language Tests.  |  Linguistic Performance.  |  Phonology.  |  Racial Differences.  |  Reading Achievement.  |  Sociolinguistics.  |  Standard Spoken Usage.  |  White Students.  |  California
Other authors/contributors Hoover, Mary R., author  |  Stanford Univ., CA. School of Education  |  Stanford Univ., CA. Stanford Center for Research and Development in Teaching
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED062464 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.