National Library of Australia

Reopening Update - August 2020: Enjoy a CovidSafe visit to the National Library. Read more...

You must be logged in to Tag Records
A Study of the Values and Attitudes of Black and White Police Officers [microform] / John E. Teahan
Bib ID 5246935
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Teahan, John E
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1972 
245 p. 
Summary

Better understanding, openness, and trust among black and white police officers would increase police effectiveness in dealing with police-community relations. This study discusses a program to improve black-white police relations through role playing techniques and small group interactions on problems of human relationships. Longitudinal in design, the study assesses: (1) changes in values and attitudes over time; (2) optimal implementation time for the training program; (3) effectiveness of the program; and (4) the attitudinal effect on officers of precinct assignments and inter-racial contact. Some positive changes took place in the attitudes of black officers participating in the program during academy training. Negative attitude changes occurred in white participants and spread to white non-participants. A similar program conducted a year later avoided the severe backlash effect by downplaying its racially-motivated aspects. It, too, failed to improve black-white relations in any significant way. It appears that polarization between black and white officers begins upon entrance to the police academy, although a training program can sensitize each group to the other. Precinct assignment has little impact on values but strong impact on attitudes development, with duty in white precincts fostering undesirable viewpoints about blacks among both black and white officers. The study suggests that rotating precinct assignments for all officers would be a helpful step in combating stereotypic racial attitudes among all police. (Author/NMF)

Notes

Sponsoring Agency: Michigan State Dept. of Education, Lansing.

Sponsoring Agency: New Detroit, Inc., MI.

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Attitude Change.  |  Black Attitudes.  |  Educational Programs.  |  Interpersonal Relationship.  |  Police.  |  Police Community Relationship.  |  Racial Attitudes.  |  Racial Relations.  |  Role Playing.  |  Values.
Other authors/contributors Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI. Dept. of Psychology
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED080915 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.