National Library of Australia

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Does Migration Interfere with Children's Progress in School? [microform] / Larry H. Long
Bib ID 5256613
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Long, Larry H
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1974 
22 p. 
Summary

This paper relates frequency of interstate migration and the likelihood of a child's being enrolled in school at the modal grade for age, controlling for socioeconomic status of the family. The 1970 Census of Population obtained information on school enrollment and current grade, state of birth, residence in 1965, and residence in 1970. A measure of relative progress in school was obtained by adjusting a child's age back to October 1, 1969 and comparing with grade of enrollment. The probability of a child's being enrolled below the modal grade for age is highly correlated with the various measures of socioeconomic status and family stability. This measure of relative progress in school was cross-tabulated with frequency of interstate migration. This indicator understates the actual amount of interstate migration, for some children could have moved several times between birth and 1965 and between 1965 and 1970, but in each case only one move would have been counted. Frequent interstate migration is found to be associated with an increased likelihood of being enrolled below the modal grade for age among children whose parents are not college graduates. For children of college graduates frequent interstate migration is associated with a reduction of grade skipping. Interstate migration is most likely to be undertaken by well-educated persons whose children tend to do well in school, and for this reason children who have made frequent interstate moves are less likely to be behind in school than less mobile children. (Author/JM)

Notes

ERIC Note: Revised version of paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (New York, New York, August 1973).

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Academic Achievement.  |  Age Differences.  |  Census Figures.  |  Enrollment.  |  Family Characteristics.  |  Geographic Location.  |  Migrant Education.  |  National Surveys.  |  Parent Background.  |  Parent Education.  |  Relocation.  |  Residential Patterns.  |  Socioeconomic Status.  |  Student Promotion.  |  Transfer Students.
Form/genre Speeches/Meeting Papers.
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED091475 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.