National Library of Australia

We’re delighted to be able to increase our reading room services and opening hours. Read more...

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 153 of 3086
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Nonverbal Behavior in Tutoring Interactions [microform] / Robert S. Feldman
Bib ID 5285805
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Feldman, Robert S
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1975 
15 p. 
Summary

This document reports on a series of studies carried out concerning nonverbal behavior in peer tutoring interactions. The first study examined the encoding (enactment) of nonverbal behavior in a tutoring situation. Results clearly indicated that the tutor's nonverbal behavior was affected by the performance of the tutee. The question of whether or not nonverbal "leakage" (failure to hide undesired displays of negative affect) occurs was raised in this study and tested in another. Findings from the second study indicated that tutors encode differentially according to whether or not they are being truthful, and moreover, that other untrained students were capable of decoding such behavior. Because the difference in the tutor's nonverbal behavior in the above situation could have been caused by the lying itself, or by his/her negative feelings regarding the failing tutee, a third study was performed to determine causality. Results from this study indicated that both factors--deception and a dislike for the tutee--cause negative verbal behavior in the tutor. A fourth study was carried out to determine the tutor's ability to understand the meaning of the nonverbal behavior of a tutee in regard to his/her degree of comprehension. Results revealed that (a) children encode nonverbally the degree of comprehension of material being presented to them, and (b) their nonverbal behavior can be decoded by other children. These studies indicate that nonverbal behavior is, in fact, an important factor in the tutoring situation and must be considered when examining tutoring interactions. (PB)

Notes

ERIC Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Washington, D.C., April 1975).

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Nonverbal Communication.  |  Peer Teaching.  |  Research.  |  Student Behavior.  |  Student Teacher Relationship.  |  Teacher Behavior.  |  Tutoring.
Form/genre Speeches/Meeting Papers.
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED104853 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.