National Library of Australia

Due to major building activity, some collections are unavailable. Please check your requests before visiting. Learn more.

Next record >>
Record 1 of 5
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Home Management and Human Service Competencies [microform]
Bib ID 5292068
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Regional Learning Service of Central New York, Syracuse
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1975 
163 p. 
Summary

Faculty representatives from five postsecondary institutions having human service/human ecology programs and two members of the Regional Learning Service staff comprised a task force whose objectives were to identify competencies acquired through home management which relate to undergraduate course objectives, to recommend ways to assess these, and to recommend criteria for granting undergraduate credit for experiential learning. The task force produced a list of 54 competencies in 10 broad domains. With the checklist of competencies as a common stimulus, 20 homemakers, 25 human service agency administrators, and educators from 19 postsecondary institutions responded to different sets of questions relating to their own work roles. Responses for each group are presented with detailed analysis. Important findings were that home management competencies and domains: (1) are valued by homemakers, (2) are creditable and part of the curricula in postsecondary institutions, (3) are perceived by agency administrators as desirable for agency personnel, and (4) are valued differently by educators than by homemakers and employers. Appended materials include: report of task force activities, the questionnaire used and tabulation of responses for the three groups, statistical analysis of the data, and the first draft of the home management competency list. (Author/MS)

Notes

ERIC Note: Report of a project for Cooperative Assessment of Experiential Learning (CAEL).

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Community Resources.  |  Comparative Analysis.  |  Decision Making Skills.  |  Experiential Learning.  |  Family Health.  |  Goal Orientation.  |  Home Management.  |  Homemaking Skills.  |  Human Development.  |  Interpersonal Competence.  |  Job Analysis.  |  Money Management.  |  Role Perception.  |  Self Evaluation.  |  Skills.  |  Surveys.
Form/genre Reports, Research.
Other authors/contributors Regional Learning Service of Central New York, Syracuse
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED112028 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.