National Library of Australia

Enjoy a CovidSafe visit to the National Library. Read more...

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 5 of 229
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Preliminary Report of a Factorially Designed Experiment on Teacher Structuring, Soliciting, and Reacting. Occasional Paper No. 7 [microform]
Bib ID 5293170
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Stanford Univ., CA. Stanford Center for Research and Development in Teaching
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1975 
13 p. 
Summary

This report describes the results of an experiment on teacher structuring, soliciting, and reacting behavior. Four teachers each taught eight groups of sixth-grade students using eight different variations of the classroom recitation strategy. The eight variations differed in the amount and kind of structuring, soliciting, and reacting behavior used by the teachers. Classes that were asked more recall questions during the lesson (low soliciting) performed better on the achievement posttest than did classes that were asked more thought questions (high soliciting). Classes taught with a high level of structuring did slightly better than classes given little structuring. Classes that received praise for correct answers and reasons for the wrongness of an answer (high reacting) did slightly better than those classes given neutral feedback and no reason for an answer's being considered wrong (low teaching). Although the results of the study showed variations in the recitation strategy did not make a dramatic difference, they also did not show that the recitation strategy itself was a weak teaching approach. The results for student achievement and attitude showed that the effects of the teacher were sometimes greater than the effects attributable to the teaching variations. (Author/RC)

Notes

Availability: Stanford Center for Research and Development in Teaching, Stanford University, Stanford, California (No price quoted).

Sponsoring Agency: National Inst. of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.

Contract Number: NE-C-00-3-0061.

Educational level discussed: Elementary Education.

Educational level discussed: Grade 6.

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Elementary Education.  |  Grade 6.  |  Questioning Techniques.  |  Teacher Behavior.  |  Teacher Response.  |  Teaching Methods.
Form/genre Reports, Research.
Other authors/contributors Stanford Univ., CA. Stanford Center for Research and Development in Teaching
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED113329 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.