National Library of Australia

Due to the need to contain the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19) the Library building and reading rooms are closed to visitors until further notice.
The health and safety of our community is of great importance to us and we look forward to staying connected with you online.

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Survey of Tests Administered to Preschool Children in Texas [microform] / Joyce Evans
Bib ID 5303010
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Evans, Joyce
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1975 
21 p. 
Summary

This document presents the results of a Texas survey undertaken to ascertain which developmental diagnostic and screening tests are used in the state to identify Mexican-American preschool children with learning disabilities. A total of 91 public schools, regional service centers, and Head Start centers throughout the state responded to the survey. Respondents were asked to indicate the extent to which they used each developmental test. They also delineated their population as: (1) Black, (2) Anglo, (3) Mexican-American (tests administered in English), or (4) Mexican-American (tests administered in Spanish). Results showed that the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, followed by the Stanford-Binet and IPAT Culture-Fair Intelligence Test, were used by the largest number of sites. Of the tests administered to Mexican-Americans, almost twice as many were given in English as in Spanish. Few schools reported using observation techniques for diagnostic purposes. A number of sites indicated that they adapted or developed tests for individual diagnostic assessment of learning problems. Brief descriptions of 20 tests are provided in a Test Reference List. (BRT)

Notes

Sponsoring Agency: Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.

Contract Number: GOO-75-00592.

Contract Number: OEG-0-74-0550.

Educational level discussed: Preschool Education.

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Bilingual Students.  |  Black Students.  |  Classroom Observation Techniques.  |  Diagnostic Tests.  |  Handicap Identification.  |  Learning Disabilities.  |  Measurement Instruments.  |  Mexican Americans.  |  Preschool Education.  |  Questionnaires.  |  Screening Tests.  |  Spanish Speaking.  |  Special Education.  |  State Surveys.  |  Tables (Data)  |  Texas
Form/genre Reports, Research.
Other authors/contributors Southwest Educational Development Lab., Austin, TX
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED122945 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.