National Library of Australia

Due to major building activity some of our collections are temporarily unavailable. Please check the catalogue carefully to find out if your selection is impacted.  Learn more

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Court, Congress, and School Desegregation [microform] / Robert B. McKay
Bib ID 5303298
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
McKay, Robert B
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1975 
36 p. 
Summary

Congressional attempts to curb the power of the Federal courts in the area of school desegregation date largely from the Supreme Court's decision in Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education in 1971. It is a response to the court's approval in that case of busing as a remedy that may in some circumstances be used to alleviate the effects of de jure racial segregation. Opposition to busing appears to command a majority in Congress. This has not yet led to a head-on confrontation with the courts because legislation thus far enacted has been framed to avoid constitutional difficulties. And it now appears that the primary focus of congressional interest is an anti-busing amendment to the Constitution. Analysis of the proposed amendments and statutes requires a review of both the existing statutes and the case law, which is made here. The constitutionality of past and present anti-busing efforts is then assessed. It is noted that the present session of Congress has seen attempts at the passage of further anti-busing legislation that are significant not so much because of the nature of the proposed legislation as because of the support it has gathered. If a constitutional amendment is to be passed, which is believed unlikely, then more legislation will probably be forthcoming and a clash with the judiciary may be unavoidable. (Author/JM)

Notes

ERIC Note: Paper presented at a consultation with the Commission on Civil Rights (Washington, D.C., December 8, 1975).

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Bus Transportation.  |  Constitutional History.  |  Court Litigation.  |  Desegregation Litigation.  |  Desegregation Methods.  |  Educational Legislation.  |  Federal Courts.  |  Federal Government.  |  Federal Legislation.  |  Legal Problems.  |  Political Issues.  |  School Desegregation.  |  Student Transportation.  |  Supreme Court Litigation.  |  Transfer Programs.  |  United States History.
Form/genre Reports, Research.
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED123304 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.