National Library of Australia

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 6 of 118
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Decomposing a Student Team Technique [microform] : Team Reward and Team Task / Robert E. Slavin and John S. Wodarski
Bib ID 5356462
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Slavin, Robert E
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.]] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1977 
12 p. 
Summary

Student team techniques, involving two conceptually distinct components--a cooperative reward structure, in which students are evaluated and rewarded based on the performance of the group as a whole, and a cooperative task structure, in which students are encouraged to peer tutor--have had positive effects compared to control methods on academic achievement. This study hypothesizes that there would be a positive effect on percent of time on task both for teams and for tutoring, and that there would be an interaction in favor of a team-tutoring combination. The subjects were 275 fourth-grade students in eleven classes in a primarily white rural school. Classes were assigned to one of four treatment conditions: teams and tutoring, teams only, tutoring only, and neither teams nor tutoring. Results of the experiment support two of the hypotheses; participation on learning teams did increase the percentage of time students spent on task, and also increased the percent of time students spent peer tutoring. On the other hand, no team tutoring interaction was found, and there was a peer tutoring effect on percent of time on task in favor of tutoring. However, team learning techniques have had positive effects on a variety of nonacademic variables, including cross-racial friendship, mutual concern, and self-esteem, and it is doubtful that these effects would be obtained without the tutoring component of student team learning techniques. (DS)

Notes

Sponsoring Agency: National Inst. of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.

Contract Number: NE-C-00-3-0114.

ERIC Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association (San Francisco, California, 1977).

Educational level discussed: Elementary Education.

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Academic Achievement.  |  Cooperation.  |  Elementary Education.  |  Experimental Groups.  |  Group Dynamics.  |  Hypothesis Testing.  |  Learning Processes.  |  Peer Teaching.  |  Self Directed Groups.  |  Teaching Methods.  |  Teamwork.
Form/genre Reports, Research.
Other authors/contributors Wodarski, John S., author
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED160575 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.