National Library of Australia

Reopening Update - August 2020: Enjoy a CovidSafe visit to the National Library. Read more...

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 12 of 17
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Minority Voices in the Marketplace of Ideas [microform] : A Case Study of Women and the Fairness Doctrine / Linda Cobb-Reiley
Bib ID 5368265
Format MicroformMicroform, BookBook
Author
Cobb-Reiley, Linda
 
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1979 
14 p. 
Summary

The fairness doctrine was established by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to promote public debate over the media and to ensure that opposing viewpoints be heard on issues of public importance. To change the image of women as portrayed in the mass media, the National Organization for Women (NOW) focused on television because of the pervasive influence and effect it was assumed to have on the public. In 1971, NOW launched a campaign to monitor both network and local television broadcasting across the country. On the basis of these data, NOW filed petitions in 1972 against the license renewals of two television stations for, among other objections, their alleged failure to comply with the requirements of the fairness doctrine. NOW argued that the role of women in society is a controversial issue of public importance, but that these stations presented only one side of the issue in their programing, which portrayed women as primarily valuable for their supportive services and physical attractiveness. The FCC rejected NOW's petitions without benefit of an evidentiary hearing. While agreeing that entertainment programing could raise controversial issues, the FCC concluded that the fairness doctrine applied only if the programing amounted to "advocating a position" on the issue. (DF)

Notes

Freedom of Speech Newsletter, v5 n2 p3-13 Jun 1979.

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Bias.  |  Broadcast Industry.  |  Communication (Thought Transfer)  |  Court Litigation.  |  Federal Legislation.  |  Females.  |  Information Dissemination.  |  Media Research.  |  Programing (Broadcast)  |  Sex Discrimination.  |  Sex Fairness.  |  Sex Role.  |  Sex Stereotypes.  |  Television.  |  Fairness Doctrine  |  Federal Communications Commission National Organization for Women
Form/genre Historical Materials.  |  Journal Articles.
Other authors/contributors Western Speech Communication Association
Available From ERIC 

Online

    In the Library

    Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

    Details Collect From
    mc 2253 ED172305 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
    This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

    Order a copy

    - Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

    Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
    close Can I borrow items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close What can I get online?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
    Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.