National Library of Australia

The National Library Reading Rooms are now open at reduced hours. Find out more to plan your visit.

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Imitation as a Skill in Infancy [microform] / Albert R. Hollenbeck and Ronald G. Slaby
Bib ID 5368840
Format MicroformMicroform, BookBook
Author
Hollenbeck, Albert R
 
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1975 
13 p. 
Summary

The acquisition of imitative responses without reinforcement was investigated with infants by eliminating contingent reinforcement through the use of videotaped models. Twenty-nine male and female infants were randomly assigned to one of two groups, a Rhythmic Vocalization Group or a Conversation Control Group. Infants in the first group were shown a videotape of an adult female model repeating a novel phoneme in a sequence of sounds and pauses. Infants in the second group were shown a 10-minute videotape of a conversation in a daytime television drama. Trained observers behind a one-way vision mirror scored the frequency and duration of six types of behavior, including vocalization of the novel phoneme. Two types of data analyses were performed: a 2 (Treatment Group) X 2 (Sex of subject) X 3 (Repeated Sessions) analysis of variance, and an event sequential analysis to determine whether observed vocalizations at any lag significantly exceeded expectation. The general findings were: (1) no infant in the study imitated the novel phoneme or repeated the precise phoneme pattern; (2) data from the sequential analysis indicated evidence for imitation of the rhythmic component of the phoneme pattern; and (3) the type of stimulus presented had differential effects on males and females. Although there were no differences at pretest, following treatment males increased their vocalizations in response to the conversation videotape while females decreased their vocalizations. (Author/SS)

Notes

ERIC Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Western Psychological Association (Sacramento, California, April, 1975).

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Females.  |  Imitation.  |  Infant Behavior.  |  Infants.  |  Language Acquisition.  |  Language Rhythm.  |  Males.  |  Modeling (Psychology)  |  Phonemes.  |  Psychological Studies.  |  Sex Differences.  |  Social Reinforcement.
Form/genre Speeches/Meeting Papers.  |  Reports, Research.
Other authors/contributors Slaby, Ronald G., author  |  Washington Univ., Seattle
Available From ERIC 

Online

    In the Library

    Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

    Details Collect From
    mc 2253 ED172921 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
    This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

    Order a copy

    - Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

    Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
    close Can I borrow items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close What can I get online?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
    Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.