National Library of Australia

The National Library building is closed temporarily until further notice, in line with ACT Government COVID-19 health restrictions.
Find out more

Record 1 of 1
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Barriers to Entry into Non-Traditional Occupations for Women [microform] : A Study to Determine the Ability to Discriminate among Groups / Karen L Denbroeder and Hollie B. Thomas
Bib ID 5382045
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Denbroeder, Karen L
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1980 
36 p. 
Summary

The purpose of the study reported in this speech was to ascertain whether perceived barriers to entering nontraditional occupations as measured by a barriers-to-entry survey could be employed to accurately discriminate among women's consideration of a nontraditional occupation. Using a stratified random sample of 500 women (51% response) living in a moderately large Southeastern city who were employed in traditional occupations of nursing, teaching, and secretarial work, the two-part survey sought to discriminate among women who had given little, serious, or no consideration to entering a nontraditional occupation. Results of the survey indicate that membership in these deterrent groups can be identified on the basis of perceived barriers. Specifically, the findings lend support to two assumptions: (1) the greater the consideration a woman gives to nontraditional occupations, the more she will be deterred and the more helpless she learns to feel; (2) women discover that the role of female is considered more important than a career role, even when entering a nontraditional field. (The data and the complete eighteen-page questionnaire, Survey of Women's Attitudes about Careers are included.) (MEK)

Notes

Sponsoring Agency: Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.

Contract Number: G007702136.

ERIC Note: Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting (Boston, MA, April, 1980).

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Career Choice.  |  Employed Women.  |  Employee Attitudes.  |  Females.  |  Nontraditional Occupations.  |  Nurses.  |  Occupational Surveys.  |  Questionnaires.  |  Role Conflict.  |  Role Perception.  |  Secretaries.  |  Sex Bias.  |  Sex Role.  |  Social Bias.  |  Vocational Education.  |  Women Faculty.
Form/genre Reports, Research.  |  Speeches/Meeting Papers.
Other authors/contributors Thomas, Hollie B., author
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED186637 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.