National Library of Australia

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 7 of 21
You must be logged in to Tag Records
The Impact of the Introduction and Diffusion of Television on Children Living in Three Australian Towns [microform] / John P. Murray and Susan Kippax
Bib ID 5382854
Format MicroformMicroform, BookBook
Author
Murray, John P
 
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1980 
17 p. 
Summary

This report compares the first and second years of a 4-year study on changes in patterns of social behavior and conceptions of 8-12 year-old children following the introduction of television in their community. Three towns of similar composition were selected for their naturally occuring differences in quantity and duration of experience with television. At the beginning of this study, the "High-TV" town had had five years' experience with two channels, the "Low-TV" town had had one year's experience with only one channel, and the "No-TV" town did not receive a television signal. During the second year of the study, the "No-TV" (now "New-TV") town began receiving the public channel. In the first year of the study, comparisons of the "No-TV" and "Low-TV" children demonstrated a clear decrease in radio listening, reading, listening to records, attending movies, playing sports, engaging in outdoor activities, and participating in clubs and parties when television was available. However, it is suggested that these decreases may reflect the novelty of television in the "Low-TV" town, because the children in the "High-TV" town manifested higher levels of involvement in these activities than their peers in the "Low-TV" town. This novelty effect was further supported by the results from the second year of the study: children in the former "No-TV," now "New-TV," town manifested the lowest level of participation in various activities and use of alternative media. (Author/SS)

Notes

ERIC Note: Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the International Communication Association (Acapulco, Mexico, May 1980).

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Behavior Patterns.  |  Children.  |  Crime.  |  Foreign Countries.  |  Influences.  |  Mass Media.  |  Naturalistic Observation.  |  Occupations.  |  Perception.  |  Recreational Activities.  |  Social Behavior.  |  Television Viewing.  |  Australia  |  Naturalistic Research
Form/genre Reports, Research.  |  Speeches/Meeting Papers.
Other authors/contributors Kippax, Susan, author
Available From ERIC 

Online

    In the Library

    Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

    Details Collect From
    mc 2253 ED187470 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
    This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

    Order a copy

    - Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

    Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
    close Can I borrow items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close What can I get online?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
    Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.