National Library of Australia

We’re delighted to be able to increase our reading room services and opening hours. Read more...

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 4 of 7
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Relevance of Mood Eating Patterns to Maintenance of Weight Loss After Treatment [microform] / Robert M. Setty and Raymond C. Hawkins
Bib ID 5384517
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Setty, Robert M
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1980 
13 p. 
Summary

Relapses in alcoholics, smokers, and heroin users are frequently provoked by stress. Individuals often return to using addictive substances when feeling angry or frustrated as the result of negative mood states, interpersonal conflict, or social pressure. A behavioral weight-control program used to treat 140 overweight college students was evaluated during follow-up periods of 4-28 months to determine if emotional factors and external pressures were important in the failure of subjects to maintain weight losses. Most completers of the treatment program lost moderate amounts of weight which were, in many instances, not maintained after treatment termination. Analyses indicated that individuals with eating patterns related to negative emotional states and individuals who were married were most likely to gain weight in the follow-up period. Results suggest there is a need to investigate high-risk situations which provoke weight gain and to prepare program participants to cope with subsequent stressful episodes. (Author/HLM)

Notes

ERIC Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the Southwestern Psychological Association (26th, Oklahoma City, OK, April 10-12, 1980).

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Affective Behavior.  |  Behavior Change.  |  Behavior Patterns.  |  Body Weight.  |  College Students.  |  Eating Habits.  |  Environmental Influences.  |  Followup Studies.  |  Obesity.  |  Program Effectiveness.  |  Program Evaluation.  |  Self Control.  |  Self Help Programs.
Form/genre Reports, Research.  |  Speeches/Meeting Papers.
Other authors/contributors Hawkins, Raymond C., author
Available From ERIC 
000 02737cam a22004332u 4500
001 5384517
005 20181018120726.0
007 he u||024||||
008 080220s1980    xxu ||| bt    ||| | eng d
035 |9(ericd)ED188082
037 |aED188082|bERIC
040 |aericd|beng|cericd|dMvI
091 |amfm
100 1 |aSetty, Robert M.
245 1 0 |aRelevance of Mood Eating Patterns to Maintenance of Weight Loss After Treatment|h[microform] /|cRobert M. Setty and Raymond C. Hawkins.
260 |a[Washington, D.C.] :|bDistributed by ERIC Clearinghouse,|c1980.
300 |a13 p.
500 |aERIC Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the Southwestern Psychological Association (26th, Oklahoma City, OK, April 10-12, 1980).|5ericd
520 |aRelapses in alcoholics, smokers, and heroin users are frequently provoked by stress. Individuals often return to using addictive substances when feeling angry or frustrated as the result of negative mood states, interpersonal conflict, or social pressure. A behavioral weight-control program used to treat 140 overweight college students was evaluated during follow-up periods of 4-28 months to determine if emotional factors and external pressures were important in the failure of subjects to maintain weight losses. Most completers of the treatment program lost moderate amounts of weight which were, in many instances, not maintained after treatment termination. Analyses indicated that individuals with eating patterns related to negative emotional states and individuals who were married were most likely to gain weight in the follow-up period. Results suggest there is a need to investigate high-risk situations which provoke weight gain and to prepare program participants to cope with subsequent stressful episodes. (Author/HLM)
530 |aMay also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18:|uhttps://eric.ed.gov/
533 |aMicrofiche.|b[Washington D.C.]:|cERIC Clearinghouse|emicrofiches : positive.
650 1 7 |aAffective Behavior.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aBehavior Change.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aBehavior Patterns.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aBody Weight.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aCollege Students.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aEating Habits.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aEnvironmental Influences.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aFollowup Studies.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aObesity.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aProgram Effectiveness.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aProgram Evaluation.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aSelf Control.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aSelf Help Programs.|2ericd
655 7 |aReports, Research.|2ericd
655 7 |aSpeeches/Meeting Papers.|2ericd
700 1 |aHawkins, Raymond C.,|eauthor.
856 4 1 |uhttps://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED188082
984 |aANL|cmc 2253 ED188082|d77000000195759
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.