National Library of Australia

We’re delighted to be able to increase our reading room services and opening hours. Read more...

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 4 of 9
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Sex Differences In Intercultural Discourse [microform] : An Empirical Analysis / Michael J. Schneider and William J. Jordan
Bib ID 5384699
Format MicroformMicroform, BookBook
Author
Schneider, Michael J
 
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1980 
24 p. 
Summary

Previous interpretations of male/female discourse were examined in light of new data generated from a study of intercultural mixed-sex dyads. Eleven dyads, each consisting of a Chinese and an American subject, were videotaped in 30-minute conversations about courtship in different cultures. The tapes were content analyzed to obtain information on amount of time spent talking by members of each sex and culture group, number of informative questions asked by members of sex and group, number of interruptions, and number of tag questions used. In addition, 26 American subjects rated each dyad member on measures of dominance, expertness, linguistic skill, attractiveness, helpfulness, and apprehensiveness. The results showed that the percentage of time spent talking per dyad was significantly related to sex, with males talking more than females; however, the average length of talk was found not to be significantly correlated with sex. The percentage of time talked per dyad was not found to be related significantly to perceived dominance, but the average length of talk was correlated significantly with dominance. The findings suggest that stereotypes of the "submissive" female and the "aggressive" male may not hold true in intercultural interactions. (Author/FL)

Notes

ERIC Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Central States Speech Association (Chicago, IL, April 10-12, 1980).

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Chinese Culture.  |  Communication Research.  |  Communication (Thought Transfer)  |  Cultural Differences.  |  Discourse Analysis.  |  Interpersonal Relationship.  |  Linguistic Competence.  |  North American Culture.  |  Psychological Studies.  |  Sex Differences.  |  Sex Role.  |  Intercultural Communication
Form/genre Reports, Research.  |  Speeches/Meeting Papers.
Other authors/contributors Jordan, William J., author
Available From ERIC 

Online

    In the Library

    Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

    Details Collect From
    mc 2253 ED188266 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
    This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

    Order a copy

    - Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

    Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
    close Can I borrow items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close What can I get online?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
    Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.