National Library of Australia

Due to major building activity some of our collections are temporarily unavailable. Please check the catalogue carefully to find out if your selection is impacted.  Learn more

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Persistence of Fall 1977 Transfers to CSULA [microform] : Second Report / Ben K. Gold
Bib ID 5405227
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Gold, Ben K
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1981 
34 p. 
Summary

In fall 1981, a study was conducted of the 386 Los Angeles City College (LACC) students who transferred to the California State University at Los Angeles (CSULA) in fall 1977. The study, which examined student persistence through the third year after transfer and determined graduation rates, was a follow-up to an earlier study of student persistence through the first two years. Information on units attempted and completed, grade point average (GPA), declared major, and division in which enrolled was obtained from CSULA quarterly reports to LACC, while graduation statistics were determined using CSULA commencement programs for 1978 through 1981. Selected findings include the following: (1) three years after transferring, 24% of the students were still in attendance at CSULA; (2) by spring 1980, 17% of the students had received a bachelor's degree and by spring 1981, 25% had earned the degree; (3) bachelor's degrees were awarded for 31 different majors in five schools; the most frequently awarded were degrees in business; (4) 52% of the degrees were awarded to females, who constituted 48% of the study group; and (5) while students in the School of Business and Economics had average GPA's significantly below those in other schools in the first two years, the gap closed somewhat during the third year. The study report details methodology and findings and includes extensive data tables. Selected findings from the two-year persistence study are included for comparison. (Author/KL)

Notes

Educational level discussed: Postsecondary Education.

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Academic Persistence.  |  Attendance Patterns.  |  College Graduates.  |  College Transfer Students.  |  Community Colleges.  |  Followup Studies.  |  Graduation.  |  Postsecondary Education.  |  State Universities.  |  Two Year College Students.
Form/genre Reports, Research.  |  Numerical/Quantitative Data.
Other authors/contributors Los Angeles City Coll., CA
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED208927 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.