National Library of Australia

The NLA building is currently closed but will start reopening to the public from Monday 15 November. Find out more...

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 2 of 7
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Productivity, A Priority for Industrial Arts [microform] / Walter S. Mietus
Bib ID 5433896
Format MicroformMicroform, BookBook
Author
Mietus, Walter S
 
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1982 
11 p. 
Summary

The need for increased industrial productivity has become great in American society. If America is not to be outstripped by foreign competitors, worker productivity must be increased. Industrial arts can play a part in increasing productivity by fostering productive ideas in students. Attempts at work redesign have led to short-term increases in productivity but have not always led to sustained productivity improvement. Since attempts at attitude improvement in workers do not always continue after an innovative approach, new priorities should be set for industrial education. There should be a thrust for research in methods of quality of working life and for strategies to develop the awareness and skills in youth necessary to function in the roles required in industry for improving productivity. Somewhere in the background of the American work force there needs to be educational experiences that are designed to develop the skills of productive thinking. Students can be made conscious of their power to produce ideas and their power to convert ideas to products that form the content of this world. People can be taught to make incremental improvements in their productive thinking abilities. Two techniques used in workshops to increase productive thinking are the "Golden Touch Techniques" and the Semantic Interdisciplinary and Combination of Reality Factors Technique. Use of these techniques in industrial arts can help students to improve their thinking and contribute to industrial productivity. (KC)

Notes

ERIC Note: Paper presented at the American Vocational Association Convention (Anaheim, MO, December 1982).

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Creative Thinking.  |  Educational Improvement.  |  Industrial Arts.  |  Job Development.  |  Job Simplification.  |  Postsecondary Education.  |  Productivity.  |  Program Improvement.  |  Quality of Life.  |  Research Needs.  |  Trade and Industrial Education.
Form/genre Opinion Papers.  |  Speeches/Meeting Papers.
Available From ERIC 

Online

    In the Library

    Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

    Details Collect From
    mc 2253 ED237782 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
    This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

    Order a copy

    - Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

    Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
    close Can I borrow items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close What can I get online?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
    Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.