National Library of Australia

Enjoy a CovidSafe visit to the National Library. Read more...

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 5 of 743
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Oversight Hearing on Student Loan Marketing Associations. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Postsecondary Education of the Committee on Education and Labor. House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session [microform]
Bib ID 5442680
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1983 
66 p. 
Summary

Oversight hearings on the Student Loan Marketing Association (Sallie Mae) are presented. Sallie Mae was established by the Education Amendments of 1972 to provide liquidity for Guaranteed Student Loan (GSL) lenders by purchasing GSL portfolios from lenders or making loans on GSL loans held by lenders. In 1982, Sallie Mae had total cumulative interest earning assets in excess of $5 billion. Currently, the Association also consolidates student loans, serving as a direct lender in areas where there are inadequate loans available from commercial lenders. Attention is directed, in the course of the hearings, to the Association's operations, its financial structure, its status in the private sector, and its future operating plans. Details are provided on its growth and assets, earnings, and dividends. Attention is also directed to new authorities of Sallie Mae, including the bankruptcy priority, the consolidation authority, the purchase of a savings and loan company, the question of whether it is subject to state taxation, and other state-related concerns. It is noted that the Association is both a quasi-governmental private corporation that has corporate responsibilities to its shareholders, and, on the other hand, a public purpose or a public responsibility to insure GSL access to students. (SW)

Notes

ERIC Note: Document contains small print.

Educational level discussed: Higher Education.

Policymakers.

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Agency Role.  |  Banking.  |  Capital.  |  Financial Services.  |  Hearings.  |  Higher Education.  |  Position Papers.  |  Student Financial Aid.  |  Student Loan Programs.  |  Guaranteed Student Loan Program Student Loan Marketing Association
Form/genre Legal/Legislative/Regulatory Materials.  |  Reports, Descriptive.
Other authors/contributors Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED246760 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.