National Library of Australia

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 256 of 570
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Connections with the Liberal Arts and Industry [microform] : Attempts to Legitimize the Profession of Teaching Technical Writing / Dale Sullivan
Bib ID 5451608
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Sullivan, Dale
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1985 
18 p. 
Summary

Because technical writing is a subject that exists in two separate contexts (a combination of practical and liberal arts), teachers of the subject must legitimize their profession by appealing to different authorities. Those attempting to strengthen the connections with the industrial world do so by (1) showing that technical writing is needed, (2) studying the way it is practiced in the real world and making present practice definitive, (3) creating courses that simulate real-life writing, and (4) emphasizing the need for teachers to have practical experience in the profession. Other writers argue that teaching technical writing is more than mere training, that writing is more than a set of techniques. Their articles can be seen as pieces of rhetoric aimed at their colleagues in the liberal arts tradition, focusing on such topics as the use of communication/rhetorical theory to evaluate present practice, the application of theory to the subject of technical writing, the definition of technical writing, and the argument that English teachers can and should teach technical writing. From a rhetorical perspective, these articles are performing a valuable service. Since their immediate audience is the community of technical writing teachers, they can be seen as epideictic discourse that reinforces the faithful and continues to shape the community's view of what the discipline is. Thirty-one references are listed. (HOD)

Notes

ERIC Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (36th, Minneapolis, MN, March 21-23, 1985). For a related document, see CS 208 816.

Educational level discussed: Higher Education.

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Business.  |  Higher Education.  |  Industry.  |  Liberal Arts.  |  Professional Development.  |  Professional Recognition.  |  Scholarly Journals.  |  Student Attitudes.  |  Teacher Attitudes.  |  Technical Writing.  |  Writing Instruction.
Form/genre Speeches/Meeting Papers.  |  Opinion Papers.
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED254859 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.