National Library of Australia

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Retention of Nontraditional Students in Postsecondary Education [microform] / John C. Weidman
Bib ID 5457833
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Weidman, John C
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1985 
16 p. 
Summary

Two recent studies proved the usefulness of predictors of academic performance and conceptual models that were developed primarily from research on traditional college students for the study of retention among nontraditional adult students in conventional postsecondary programs. Some modifications and extensions were suggested. The first study investigated the accuracy with which conventional demographic and achievement measures would differentiate between persisters and nonpersisters among adult students at Youngstown State University. A stepwise discriminant analysis identified four variables that explained 25 percent of the variance in the study population: financial aid, grade point average, matriculation status, and age. Using these four variables in the discriminant function to classify persisters and nonpersisters resulted in the correct classification of 81 percent of the study population--88 percent of the nonpersisters and 57 percent of the persisters. The second study explored the appropriateness of the conceptual model developed by Tinto from research on dropout among traditional college students for understanding dropout among a nontraditional student group (older, mostly minority women on welfare) enrolled in a postsecondary nondegree vocational training program. Findings indicated program completion was related not to personal background characteristics but to academic aptitude and the significance of students' integration to both academic and non-academic sectors. (YLB)

Notes

ERIC Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (69th, Chicago, IL, March 31 - April 4, 1985).

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Academic Achievement.  |  Academic Persistence.  |  Adult Students.  |  College Attendance.  |  College Students.  |  Dropout Research.  |  Dropouts.  |  Educational Research.  |  Higher Education.  |  Measures (Individuals)  |  Nontraditional Students.  |  Postsecondary Education.  |  School Holding Power.  |  Student Attrition.  |  Withdrawal (Education)
Form/genre Reports, Research.  |  Speeches/Meeting Papers.
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED261195 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.