National Library of Australia

Due to the need to contain the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19) the Library building and reading rooms are closed to visitors until further notice.
The health and safety of our community is of great importance to us and we look forward to staying connected with you online.

You must be logged in to Tag Records
A Study of the State of Tennessee Career Ladder Program for Teachers [microform] / Thomas L. Reddick and Larry E. Peach
Bib ID 5461669
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Reddick, Thomas L
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1985 
8 p. 
Summary

A total of 516 teachers in 25 school systems in Middle Tennessee responded to a questionnaire relating to their attitudes about the Career Ladder Program in Tennessee. The program delineates a five-step classification system: (1) probationary teachers; (2) apprentice teachers; (3) career level I teachers; (4) career level II teachers; and (5) career level III teachers. About half of the teachers surveyed believed that the program will improve the quality of instruction in Tennessee public schools. However, most teachers did not think that the program will necessarily attract more qualified individuals into the teaching profession nor serve as an incentive for educators to remain in the field. About 85 percent of the teachers felt that the program will cause morale problems because of the pay differentials, but 40 percent stated that they had become better teachers because of the career ladder program. While most respondents felt that prospective teachers should be required to pass a competency examination, most did not believe that those presently teaching should be required periodically to pass a test measuring their knowledge and skills in their content area. Most teachers did not report that fair evaluations were likely to occur in their school system. (CB)

Notes

ERIC Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Mid-South Educational Research Association (14th, Biloxi, MS, November 7, 1985).

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Career Ladders.  |  Elementary Secondary Education.  |  Program Attitudes.  |  State Programs.  |  Teacher Attitudes.  |  Teacher Evaluation.  |  Teacher Morale.  |  Career Ladder Program Tennessee
Form/genre Speeches/Meeting Papers.  |  Reports, Research.  |  Numerical/Quantitative Data.
Other authors/contributors Peach, Larry E., author
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED265120 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.