National Library of Australia

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Adult Learning in Self-Help [microform] : Mutual Aid Support Groups / Myrna Lynn Hammerman
Bib ID 5472049
Format MicroformMicroform, BookBook
Author
Hammerman, Myrna Lynn
 
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1986 
12 p. 
Summary

Although the origins of self-help groups can be traced back to early history, the self-help movement as we know it today began almost 50 years ago. Approximately 15 million Americans currently belong to about 500,000 different self-help groups. Adults in transition are likely to seek both formal and informal sources of help when faced with changing life circumstances. Although people who seek self-help within their social network appear to represent a cross section of the general population, those who eventually go to human services tend to be white, young, educated, middle class, and female. The number of inner-city residents and minority group members is surprisingly low. Although many self-help groups have been founded by professionals, most are based on principles of mutual aid and use important and effective mechanisms for learning that are very different from those that most professionals use in private practice. The self-help process involves a number of components, including an empowering self-help philosophy, a support dimension, a therapeutic aspect, a spiritual or missionizing element, and an educational component. Self-help groups tend to take on very diverse oganizational forms, with very different degrees of formal versus informal structure and very different ways and degrees of involving professionals in their activities. Regardless of the form it takes, however, the self-help group can serve as an important forum for self-directed adult learning throughout the life span. (MN)

Notes

ERIC Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education (Hollywood, FL, October 1986).

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Adult Learning.  |  Adult Programs.  |  Group Structure.  |  Independent Study.  |  Lifelong Learning.  |  Postsecondary Education.  |  Self Directed Groups.  |  Self Help Programs.  |  Social Support Groups.
Form/genre Opinion Papers.  |  Speeches/Meeting Papers.
Available From ERIC 
000 02937cam a22003612u 4500
001 5472049
005 20181012145119.0
007 he u||024||||
008 080220s1986    xxu ||| b     ||| | eng d
035 |9(ericd)ED274777
037 |aED274777|bERIC
040 |aericd|beng|cericd|dMvI
091 |amfm
100 1 |aHammerman, Myrna Lynn.
245 1 0 |aAdult Learning in Self-Help|h[microform] :|bMutual Aid Support Groups /|cMyrna Lynn Hammerman.
260 |a[Washington, D.C.] :|bDistributed by ERIC Clearinghouse,|c1986.
300 |a12 p.
500 |aERIC Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education (Hollywood, FL, October 1986).|5ericd
520 |aAlthough the origins of self-help groups can be traced back to early history, the self-help movement as we know it today began almost 50 years ago. Approximately 15 million Americans currently belong to about 500,000 different self-help groups. Adults in transition are likely to seek both formal and informal sources of help when faced with changing life circumstances. Although people who seek self-help within their social network appear to represent a cross section of the general population, those who eventually go to human services tend to be white, young, educated, middle class, and female. The number of inner-city residents and minority group members is surprisingly low. Although many self-help groups have been founded by professionals, most are based on principles of mutual aid and use important and effective mechanisms for learning that are very different from those that most professionals use in private practice. The self-help process involves a number of components, including an empowering self-help philosophy, a support dimension, a therapeutic aspect, a spiritual or missionizing element, and an educational component. Self-help groups tend to take on very diverse oganizational forms, with very different degrees of formal versus informal structure and very different ways and degrees of involving professionals in their activities. Regardless of the form it takes, however, the self-help group can serve as an important forum for self-directed adult learning throughout the life span. (MN)
530 |aMay also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: |uhttps://eric.ed.gov/
533 |aMicrofiche.|b[Washington D.C.]:|cERIC Clearinghouse|emicrofiches : positive.
650 1 7 |aAdult Learning.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aAdult Programs.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aGroup Structure.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aIndependent Study.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aLifelong Learning.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aPostsecondary Education.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aSelf Directed Groups.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aSelf Help Programs.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aSocial Support Groups.|2ericd
655 7 |aOpinion Papers.|2ericd
655 7 |aSpeeches/Meeting Papers.|2ericd
984 |aANL|cmc 2253 ED274777|d77000000280118
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.