National Library of Australia

The National Library building is closed temporarily until further notice, in line with ACT Government COVID-19 health restrictions.
Find out more

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Private Schools and Public Funding [microform] : Some Reflections upon an English Initiative / A. Edwards and Others
Bib ID 5474373
Format MicroformMicroform, BookBook
Author
Edwards, A
 
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1986 
30 p. 
Summary

The Assisted Places Scheme introduced by England's Conservative government in 1980 provides for the government to make up the difference between the cost of private secondary school tuition and the amount that eligible students can afford to pay (determined according to a sliding scale based on parent income). As a result, the private schools can be highly selective and students of high ability are guaranteed access to exclusive schools despite financial hardship. The program has caused significant controversy, however, since there are questions about the impact that the plan could have on the quality of education available to those not selected by private schools. Research into the impact of the scheme and its effectiveness in achieving its goals was conducted by gathering data at the national, regional, and individual school levels. National statistics, interviews with school administrators, and interviews with students and their parents provided information. While still being analyzed, the data already suggest that many students at whom the plan was directed may not be being reached, and that many supported students might have attended the same schools without government support. The political forces presenting obstacles to the research are also noted in this report. (PGD)

Notes

ERIC Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (67th, San Francisco, CA, April 16-20, 1986).

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Access to Education.  |  Educational Research.  |  Foreign Countries.  |  Government School Relationship.  |  National Programs.  |  Political Influences.  |  Political Issues.  |  Politics of Education.  |  Private School Aid.  |  Public Support.  |  School Choice.  |  Secondary Education.  |  Tuition Grants.  |  Assisted Places Scheme (England) England
Form/genre Reports, Research.  |  Speeches/Meeting Papers.
Available From ERIC 

Online

    In the Library

    Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

    Details Collect From
    mc 2253 ED277136 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
    This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

    Order a copy

    - Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

    Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
    close Can I borrow items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close What can I get online?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
    Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.