National Library of Australia

The National Library building is closed temporarily until further notice, in line with ACT Government COVID-19 health restrictions.
Find out more

Next record >>
Record 1 of 11
You must be logged in to Tag Records
A Study of the Utility of the Vowel in Open Syllable and Vowel in Closed Syllable Rules when Pronouncing Three-Syllable Words [microform] / Ivo P. Greif
Bib ID 5475210
Format MicroformMicroform, BookBook
Author
Greif, Ivo P
 
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1984 
18 p. 
Summary

To determine the usefulness in correctly pronouncing the vowels of three-syllable words of two commonly taught phonics rules and to assess whether their utility is inversely proportional to the number of syllables in a word, a study analyzed all of the over 100,000 three-syllable words in the "Scott Foresman Advanced Dictionary." As a reference, the paper quotes two frequently taught rules of phonics: (1) "when a vowel is in the middle of a one syllable word, the vowel is short"; and (2) "if the only vowel in a word is at the end of that word, it is usually long." For the purpose of the present study, these rules are restated, in order to make them applicable to syllables as well as to words: (1) "when the only vowel is not the last letter in the syllable, it represents the short sound"; and (2) "when the only vowel is the last letter in a syllable, it represents the long sound." Analysis revealed six main categories (each defined in the study) into which the three-syllable words fit. Findings indicated that the overall utility of the rules for all the open and closed syllables was 9.99% (of the 19,427 words researched). However, analysis of the correct pronunciation of the entire words containing these syllables revealed an overall utility of only 3% for the rules. These evaluations presumed that no errors were made either in syllabication or consonant pronunciation. Given that children in early first grade usually make many mistakes of this sort, it is probable that the utility of the phonics rules in question is even lower. Results supported the hypothesis that the utility of the rules is inversely proportional to the number of syllables in a word. (JD)

Notes

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Language Research.  |  Phonics.  |  Primary Education.  |  Pronunciation Instruction.  |  Stress (Phonology)  |  Structural Analysis (Linguistics)  |  Syllables.  |  Vowels.
Form/genre Reports, Research.
Available From ERIC 

Online

    In the Library

    Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

    Details Collect From
    mc 2253 ED277983 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
    This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

    Order a copy

    - Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

    Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
    close Can I borrow items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close What can I get online?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
    Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.