National Library of Australia

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Critical Thinking and Legal Discourse [microform] / Kristin R. Woolever
Bib ID 5477262
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Woolever, Kristin R
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1987 
11 p. 
Summary

Although law professors often say that first year law students need training to "think like lawyers," many law students survive law school by practicing the "skill" of rote memory. It is when they take the bar examination or actually begin to work in a law office that they need the faculty of analytical thinking, for notes must be organized into a cogent argument. Most attorneys need special facility with four cognitive processes: applying law to facts, analogizing cases, drawing inferences, and focusing abstract concepts. The ideal place to teach these critical thinking skills is in legal writing classes, where written discourse offers the best opportunity for correcting deficiencies and refining skills in using critical cognitive processes. Strategies for teaching critical thinking in legal writing seminars include the following: (1) attach the writing class to a substantive law course, (2) focus primarily on organization at a variety of levels, (3) encourage the students to make their organization visible, (4) pay more attention to the effect of the prose on the reader than to the writing process, and (5) insist on multiple revisions. Legal writing combines some elements of freshman composition, literary criticism, and technical writing but depends strongly on reasoning abilities that law students have had little opportunity to develop. (NKA)

Notes

ERIC Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (38th, Atlanta, GA, March 19-21, 1987).

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Cognitive Processes.  |  Content Area Writing.  |  Critical Thinking.  |  Expository Writing.  |  Law Schools.  |  Law Students.  |  Lawyers.  |  Legal Education (Professions)  |  Student Writing Models.  |  Writing Instruction.  |  Writing Skills.  |  Legal Writing  |  Legal Information Legal Language
Form/genre Speeches/Meeting Papers.
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED280083 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.